Advertisement

Placemaking at Pentridge for an improved social and design outcome

Anyone who has traversed the former Pentridge site in recent times can attest to how unsophisticated and unwelcoming the first tranche of apartment and townhouse projects are within the former prison's grounds. More than that it's the failure of these projects to adequately integrate with their surrounds that is perhaps most disappointing.

While developed only a few short years ago, they are almost symptomatic of a different time and/or attitude toward quality integrated development.

Yet there is hope that the vast majority of Pentridge can become a quality urban regeneration project that adequately addresses the needs of both residents and the general public. This is on the back of developer Shayher Group's recent announcement that they will facilitate the development of a large tract of land in the heart of their 6.7 hectare site for the purposes of a community piazza.

Pentridge Coburg's public realm perspective. Image: pentridgecoburg.com.au

This exercise in placemaking by way of a sprawling piazza is on face value a leap in the right direction that will go a long way to promoting the site's strengths, while also providing the wider community with increased amenity, green spaces and services. It could be argued that this underpins the fundamentals of placemaking; that is the "creation of quality public spaces that contribute to people’s health, happiness, and well being."

Shayher Group's plan is to have markets, community events and performance spaces supporting laneway retail zones and a dining precinct within the walls of the old Pentridge. Integral to the piazza are landscaped gardens, with existing and new built form including a two-level boutique shopping precinct surrounding the piazza.

The developer will this month lodge four separate planning applications with either Moreland City Council or Heritage Victoria, with the expectation of beginning works during 2017. Shayher Group's placing of the spotlight on the communal aspects of the Pentridge development follows on from their announcement during August that TFE Hotels will operate an Adina Apartment Hotel onsite.

By signing on Adina to the new Cox Architecture-designed hotel (which includes B Division) and in adding a five screen cinema complex, a greater diversification of patrons/customers will be attracted to Pentridge.

Pentridge Coburg's public realm perspective. Image: pentridgecoburg.com.au

We are excited to confirm open spaces, beautifully landscaped gardens and active retail offerings will characterise the piazza, bringing a sense of vibrancy and community to Pentridge, as well as offering a new space for locals to gather for events, picnics, markets and festivals.

The site’s centralised location makes it the perfect spot for an activated centre to complement the vibrancy of Coburg, providing the opportunity to introduce new integrated residential and food and retail offerings into the existing area.

Anthony Goh, project spokesman, Shayher Group

Pentridge is unique in that it provides an opportunity to integrate heritage and new buildings across a massive site in a suburban location.

It's expected that 14 new buildings will be delivered across the site. Not only is it a chance to appropriately meld heritage aspects of Pentridge with new built form, but also an opportunity to brings existing heritage structures up to scratch via restoration. Perhaps though, the expectation that Pentridge can act as a catalyst and provide a positive outcome for the immediate community is the best outcome of all.

3 comments

Aussie Steve's picture

The vast majority of what has been built or what is proposed to be built on this heritage site is and will be atrocious. There is no excuse for the desecration of this important site and the scale of destruction and the scale of the existing buildings and what is proposed is outrageous. There is no need to lower; cut into or damage any perimeter nor internal walls. There is no need to build any new buildings that protrude above the perimeter walls and thus become visible from near or far. And there is no need for any new buildings to be sitting as close as they have or are proposed to, to existing heritage buildings. This site will forever be known for what NOT to do to a state significant site that could have been of world significance before the State Government and Heritage Victoria and the owners/developers butchered it.

Back to top
Bilby's picture

Spot on, Aussie Steve. This site has been utterly transformed in terms of its heritage significance - Heritage Victoria has much to answer for here. We have seriously damaged one of the world's most unique and intact examples of a 19th century prison complex - the result is on par with some of the worst examples of heritage management anywhere.

https://www.nationaltrust.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/2016-03-07-P...

Back to top
Bilby's picture
Back to top
Advertisement

Development & Planning

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 - 07:00
Hawthorn's Queens Avenue is emerging as an apartment hot spot of sorts, as developers realise the worth of converting the light industrial and commercial strip into a higher density apartment enclave. Running parallel to Burwood Road, Queens Avenue now has six apartment developments in progress.

Policy, Culture & Opinion

Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 12:00
Carolyn Whitzman , University of Melbourne Liveability is an increasingly important goal of Australian planning policy. And creating cities where residents can get to most of the services they need within 20 to 30 minutes has been proposed, at both federal and state level, as a key liveability-related mechanism.

Visual Melbourne

Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 12:00
Part Three follows on from the Part One: Yarra's Edge and Part Two: Victoria Harbour. The focus of today's piece will be NewQuay and Harbour Town, the northern most precincts within Docklands. NewQuay NewQuay was the first precinct to open way back in 2003 and has probably evolved the most.

Advertisement

Transport & Design

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 - 12:00
The Victorian Government has announced the winning bidders in the tender to power Melbourne's tram network by renewable energy. At the same time, the Victorian Government has announced plans to legislate the Victorian Renewable Energy Target (VRET) ensuring that by 2020, 25% of Victoria's energy will come from renewable sources and the target rises to 40% by 2025.

Sustainability & Environment

Monday, August 21, 2017 - 12:00
The notion of Melbourne becoming a 20-minute City has been explored heavily in recent times. Seeking to provide Melburnians with the ability to 'live locally', the 20-minute City, in essence, strives to provide people with the ability to meet most of their everyday needs within a 20-minute walk, cycle or local public transport trip of their home.