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Hayball's South Melbourne vertical school wins on an international scale

Those who pushed for Fishermans Bend to host a primary school will be feeling somewhat chuffed with the news that the Hayball-designed project has scored a gong at the World Architecture Festival in Berlin.

South Melbourne Ferrars Street Primary School as it will be known, cleaned up in the Education – Future Projects category, beating out an international field of projects to claim the prize. 10 other entrants were vying for the title, encompassing architects from countries which included Vietnam, Taiwan, Russia, UK, Turkey, Morocco and Bangladesh.

Held late last week, the World Architecture Festival is a three-day event for architects and interior design professionals, culminating in the presentation of awards for design merit across dozens of categories.

Hayball's winning entry alongside fellow WAF finalists

On news of Hayball's win, firm Director Richard Leonard issued the following statement:

It’s an incredible honour to be recognised on a global scale for our work on South Melbourne Ferrars Street Primary School in Victoria, Australia in the Education – Future Projects category at the WAF Awards. As the first vertical school in the state, the project is both experimental, innovative and enthralling.

What we’re most proud of is the combination of a learning hub with a community centre for the local residents to enjoy, which embraces the connection between learning and recreation, students and neighbours.The school will be the educational home to 525 students and will include an early learning centre, multi-purpose community rooms and indoor and outdoor multi-purpose sports courts across a sleek, light-filled building spanning five storeys.

Inside, the school invites students to learn in an open atrium that connect the ground floor to the ceiling, offering endless possibilities to all who enter.

In a precinct that is one of Australia’s largest urban renewal areas and expected to swell to 80,000 residents over the next 40 years, future proofing educational facilities is a critical factor in ensuring a suburb can evolve and behave according to the needs of its residents. With this primary school which offers more than the traditional spaces for learning, we’re building a new model for education that caters to more than just students, but the broader community.

Richard Leonard, Director, Hayball
Early works have been completed

Kane Constructions have completed early works onsite, with a contractor for the main works to be announced shortly.

The project's website indicates that the new facility is expected to be operational by January 2018, with student enrolments open from the latter part of 2017. Spanning five storeys, South Melbourne Primary School will be Victoria’s first vertical school with $44 million allocated to the project over the 2016-2017 State budget.

In collaboration with City of Port Phillip, Hayball have also created a new streetscape/public realm for the Ferrars Street Education and Community Precinct. Over a 5,000sqm site, the school and surrounds have been designed as a showcase for common integrated education and communal facilities, while also considering the needs of pedestrians, cyclists and ease of access to nearby public transport.

16 comments

krzy stoff's picture

This is a brilliant project, to be sure, but with a name like "S.M-F.S.PoS. as it will be known" a most unclean phrase with those initials will provide a very unfortunate nickname for the school — they should seriously change that quicksmart!

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Mark's picture

Great concept but whether it will actually be built by this hopeless Victorian Labor Government is another question.

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theboynoodle's picture

It is under construction. Sorry if that little factoid doesn't fit in with your your political prejudices.

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Mark's picture

Yeah - just in time for the next State election eh?! Like everything Andrews does...gross populism.

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Ed B's picture

So let's get this straight: it was a great concept when convenient for you to criticise Andrews....but since it's actually getting done, it's gross populism. Excellent point, well made.

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Mark's picture

Oops - it appears interpretation is not your strong suite. Fair enough, I'll illustrate in laymans terms for you.

Great concept = i/e the actual conceptual drawings by Hayball.

Gross populism = this project, just like the announcement of extra police officers in Victoria won't actually be completed prior to the next State election. What a coincidence eh - wouldn't want any negative press surrounding your campaign would you?

Understand now or still requiring further undergraduate explanation?

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Ed B's picture

I think your naked partisanship would even make Andrew Bolt blush.

You agree that the concept is good. So you must be pleased that it is being constructed, no?

It won't be finished by the next state election. I don't understand how that is a major issue? Are you suggesting any project which cannot be planned and completed within a 3 year election cycle is gross populism? That makes zero sense, and is terrible from a planning perspective. Infact, projects which take a longer time to complete are generally the opposite of populism, because the government has less chance of basking in the glory which comes when the project is completed.

The comment on extra police officers has nothing to do with this school, so far as I can tell, apart from further highlighting your bias. To call your explanation undergraduate would be an insult to our tertiary institutions.

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theboynoodle's picture

So, Mark, help me out here.. should this be getting built or not? I'm very confused. I know you want me to be angry at the current government, but it would help me out a LOT if you could clarify exactly why. Is it because they are building a school that is a good architectural response to address a clear community need? That seems like a weird thing to be angry about buy, hey, if you say so then fair enough. I guess doing that could definitely be 'popular' so, on that basis, we could accuse the government of 'populism' and be angry about that. I, for one, think the government should focus on unpopular things and the money being spent on this school would be much better spent on paying people to stamp on kittens. Right?

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Bilby's picture

How do we know this is a popular move by the government? With the rise of average income in Richmond, this school may not be of much personal interest to a lot of parents sending their kids to private schools in the area and beyond. It will, however, cater to all the students from the neighbourhood housing commissions. Who has the greater political influence in this neck of the electoral woods - the middle classes or those in government subsidised housing?

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Mark's picture

The Labor warriors at it on this thread - absolutely nothing better than seeing you defend your fearless Socialist champion to nth degree! Thanks for the laugh!

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Ed B's picture

I'm glad you're at least laughing, because you're certainly not constructing a coherent argument.

I'm sure we'd all be very happy to hear logical criticism of any of the projects here. But your posts on this thread are so grossly contradictory and clearly partisan, that they must be challenged. If you'd bother to articulate why you're opposed to this project, if you actually are (since we can't tell from you contradictory posts), I'm interested. But if you just want to rage against the government for reasons unrelated to the project, you should use twitter.

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Grampians's picture

I would suggest that the relevant EXPERTS in the field have researched time frames for finance, build time, training the teacher cohort and waiting for an actual critical mass of pupils (insufficient demand now) ..BEFORE opening the doors

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theboynoodle's picture

@ Bilby

Do you think that people who send their kids to private schools think that the government shouldn't bother making provision for everyone else? My experience is that building new schools is rarely *un*popular.

But, anyway, Mark tells us that building this one is a populist gesture by the Trotskyites on Spring Street, so it *must* be popular.

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Bilby's picture

No, I wasn't saying that,Theboynoodle. The construction of a new state school could be popular with the electorate for a range of reasons, but I doubt it would be much of a vote getter for parents who send their kids to private schools, that's all. But, you never know.

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

I think many parents who live in the area would be spending so much of their income on paying rent or mortgages that they could not afford a private school.

Also a much samller percentage of parents send their kids to private primary schools compared to private secondary schools.

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Mark Baljak's picture

ADCO now have the site, so construction has commenced.

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