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Breathe Architecture conceive QVM's new market facility

The first tangible building that heralds the start of the Queen Victoria Market's (QVM) renewal is now at advertising.

Breathe Architecture has designed a new structure, which will act as a temporary market facility whilst the QVM undergoes its comprehensive overhaul. Absorbing a tract of land adjacent to Queen Street, Market Garden as it has been dubbed will cater for traders that are currently spread over airsheds A, B, C and D.

In line with a lengthy construction timeline for the overall QVM precinct redevelopment, market-goers and traders can expect Market Garden to operate for a period of five years.

Aerial perspective of the Market Garden. Image: OPENWORK Pty Ltd

The two storey modular structure will include an open air trading hall at ground level, with a market garden situated above.

Running from Victoria Street to Franklin Street, Market Garden will span 264 metres in length, and encompass 4,100sqm of ground floor trading area. The green spaces across Level 1 will add another 2,250sqm of useable area, with amphitheatre steps at the northern end of the structure for the purposes of event and gallery use.

Whilst the first floor is earmarked as an ‘urban greenhouse’, planning documents also flag the space being used conjointly as an educational facility. 

Breathe Architecture have conceived Market Garden as a lightweight structure, built primarily of steel and Ethylene Tetrafluoroethylene plastic (think Southern Cross Station), with clear glass capping the 13m high form. A degree of design flair comes by way of Market Garden's flanking forms which consist of white bird netting. 

Perspective view of temporary pavilion from Victoria Street. Image: City of Melbourne

Openwork Pty Ltd has chimed in with landscape concept for the project.

Existing street trees onsite will be enclosed with the Market Garden structure, supplemented by new mounded turf and rejuvenated park space at the southern end of the site. Adjacent storage containers in support of Market Garden will also see receive succulent planters atop.

Current timelines for QVM's overhaul has demolition works commencing on the existing market sheds at the turn of 2018, with Market Garden set to be operational by October of this year. Once works are completed for the QVM's $250 million overhaul, Market Garden's prefabricated design will allow it to be potentially relocated and re-used elsewhere.

1 comment

George D's picture

Do they plan to pedestrianise the road beside it? This area is populated by people, yet almost entirely given over to cars.

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