Jaques Richmond now complete

Construction of Riverlee's $290 million urban precinct in Richmond known as Jaques has recently been completed, with the Fender Katsalidis-designed development also breaking the previous apartment price record of $3 million for the area. A Glen Iris couple paid $4.8 million for the top floor penthouse.

Bordered by Coppin, Highett, Griffiths and Palmer Streets, the Jaques precinct consists of 377 apartments and townhouses across five buildings set on the former Jaques Foundry, which occupied the space between 1885-1997 and from which the development takes its name.

Founded in 1885 by Edward Jaques who along with his family fled Revolutionary France, the company produced rock crushers for quarries, a specialty in which Jaques would become world leaders with their Palmer Street Plant in Richmond. Jaques machines are still an integral part of the mining and quarry industries with Melbourne’s City Loop employing Jaques burrowing machines to dig its tunnels.

The Richmond plant was eventually sold in 1997 when the company relocated to Clayton South, and it's the site's rich industrial heritage that served as the context for the design of Jaques development.

The factory’s original red brick tower graces the south-western entrance to the site and original drawings and blueprints for the manufacturing of the rock crushing machinery are showcased throughout three of the buildings which date back to as early as 1915, sharing the story of the past with the residents and community.

The now completed Jaques courtyard. Image: Supplied

The development has proved to be a hit with the downsizer market seeking large apartments, resulting in over 20 buyers combining apartments to create more spacious residences.

Residents at Jaques value the connected location and high quality design with premium finishes and materials used throughout. Jaques has set a benchmark for urban design that respects heritage and contributes to the suburb’s sense of community with its boutique retail offering featuring Richmond’s newest eatery hotspots.

Kristine Lee, spokesperson, Riverlee Group
The recently Palmer Street rounds out the Jaques development. Image: Supplied

In March, legendary Richmond footballer Jack Dyer was honored with a street named in his memory within the project’s island site, bounded by Palmer, Coppin, Highett and Griffiths Streets.

Dyer Street will soon be home to Jamu, the newest venture from the people behind A Thousand Blessings. Jamu, meaning “to feast” in Malay, will focus on good quality food inspired by the diverse flavours of Asia and using local ingredients and produce in an industrial setting.

A Japanese diner serving unique traditional lunch and dinner dishes with a modern touch will also open within the retail precinct. Itadakimasu will be a family-style restaurant with yakitori bar seating, standard seating, and traditional seating with floor cushions.

In June the Dyer Street retail laneway welcomed boutique hair salon, Frankie Salon, which will soon be joined by The Richmond Dentist, a dentistry and cosmetic clinic which is set to open later this month.

Project team

  • Riverlee Group
  • Fender Katsalidis Architects
  • Hecker Guthrie
  • Samantha Eades
  • Macquarie Real Estate Equity Funds
  • Hacer Group
  • Merkon Constructions
  • Tract Landscape Architects
  • Aurecon
  • WSP Group

1 comment

George D's picture

A fantastic addition to the urban realm.

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