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CARLTON | Swanston Central | 168 Victoria Street | 72L | 237m | Residential

Ryan Seychell's picture
#1

I thought there was a thread for this project already, but can't seem to find one anywhere, anyways...

Website up and running: http://hemisphereaustralia.com/

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Peter Maltezos's picture

The design evolution of Hemisphere.

Elenberg Fraser

I collect, therefore I am.
thecollectormm.com.au

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Mark Baljak's picture

sales listing

http://www.realcommercial.com.au/property-land+development-vic-melbourne...

the Hemisphere website for CEL is still live oddly enough

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Adrian's picture

I fear the worst for Tower Melbourne now that CEL have pulled out of this one .. such a shame both sites.

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Ryan Seychell's picture

I'd assume this tower was meant to be ready to go once Tower Melbourne was well into construction. With TM not even started yet, the site was probably surplus to their needs right now and figured they could make a bit of money off the site while the market for development sites with approved permits was still hot.

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Crz's picture

This site is one of the last "iconic" site around Melbourne. I really do hope they don't come up with any rubbish like the render above !! we need something equally as ICONIC to the Sydney Opera house on this Axis !

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Adrian's picture

This site is one of the last "iconic" site around Melbourne. I really do hope they don't come up with any rubbish like the render above !! we need something equally as ICONIC to the Sydney Opera house on this Axis !

The site has already been robbed of any real iconic status since that grey box was put on the corner of the actual 'Axis', masking the William Barak building facade in the process - a planning cockup on both levels.

It should have been something much more iconic on the corner - along the lines of this original proposal ..

Which would have created a wonderful sightline up Swanston St equivalent to the classic CUB building & sign. It also would have opened up the corner to the public an invited people in, instead of the cold uninviting corner we have there now - just rubbish and a massive waste.

The tower is offset from the axis but in it's original form as well would have backended the corner site development with a suitable grandeur ..

But it's all far too late to save now ..

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3000's picture

I like the tower itself but given the location I was expecting something a bit more.

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Bilby's picture

Sean Godsell's Design Hub is already considered a Melbourne icon, Adrian. It's already well known in the architecture and design community right around the world, and is fast becoming one of the most photographed contemporary buildings in Melbourne.

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Ryan Seychell's picture

Is the original permit for this one still active? (Height might need to be reduced though?). Would be nice if developers bought the site and fulfilled the original plans.

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Mark Baljak's picture

massive

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johnproctor's picture

one giant ugly monster from that picture.

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3000's picture

Silver blob. Dump this garbage in Docklands with the rest of the 2nd rate stuff and move Shadow Play closer to the cbd.

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MelbourneGuy's picture

You'd think the CoM would be pursuing something more iconic here considering all the objections they make in terms of design standards with some of the newer stuff.

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Mark Baljak's picture

AFR
Chip Eng Seng Corporation doubles its money on Melbourne site sale

>> Listed Singaporean developer Chip Eng Seng has sold a residential development site in inner-city Melbourne for $64.8 million, doubling its money in just two years after gaining a planning permit for more than 1000 apartments.

The huge deal, announced on the Singapore stock exchange late on Friday, defies mounting concern from the Reserve Bank of Australia over a speculative bubble emerging in the residential development market, in Melbourne especially.

The RBA sounded its latest warning just two days before the massive Melbourne deal was announced.

On the northern edge of the CBD, the prime site at 170 Victoria Street occupies 2927 square metres of the former Carlton & United brewery, which private developer Grocon took control of in 2006.

Chip Eng Seng acquired the corner site from Grocon only two years ago for $32 million. Through its Australian subsidiary, CES Victoria, the Singaporean player gained a planning permit for a 72-storey tower. The Elengberg Fraser design comprises 1035 apartments in a mixed-use project.

The planning permit was confirmed by former state planning minister Mathew Guy in the final weeks before last year's state election, when the Coalition government lost office. Mr Guy, now state opposition leader, brushed aside Town Hall's objection against the tower's casting of some shadow over the state library forecourt nearby.

>> Chip Eng Seng is yet to reveal the buyer of the site, handled by Colliers International's Trent Hobart and Bryson Cameron. Appetite for the project drove the price to a likely record for the Carlton area, just above $22,000/sq m of land.

The deal represents an investment of almost $63,000 for each new apartment, considered a high price on a large project. It follows the RBA last week focusing its real estate worries directly on the residential development sector and warned that the risk of oversupply was most evident in inner-city Melbourne.

Chip Eng Seng's project is one of the largest approved projects to transact in central Melbourne since super fund developer ISPT sold The Age newspaper's former site, in Spencer Street, to Far East Consortium for $76 million in 2013.

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Qantas743's picture

I hope they go with the existing plans.

Any variation or new proposal would struggle to gain approval IMO.

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Adrian's picture

Standard pessimistic response from Qantas.

Any redesign will get approved no reason for Wynne to oppose it the site was always earmarked for a landmark tower and they already reduced it twice to prevent overshadowing despite whatever usual crap Clay Lucas puts in his articles like he did again today.

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Mark Baljak's picture

I for one hope the new owner redesigns. The current scheme stupidly overpowering

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Ryan Seychell's picture

I agree, current plans aren't good. 2 towers of the same height would be better.

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Mark Baljak's picture

AFR
Chinese developer Hengyi snaps up massive Melbourne site

Giant Chinese property developer Hengyi has emerged as the buyer for a massive development project on the edge of the Melbourne CBD, which has a permit for more than 1000 apartments.

Hengyi, which is a subsidiary of Shandong HYI Group, a powerful player in China's Shandong province, has significant exposure through two other residential projects in the Melbourne CBD.

The Chinese group acquired the site at 170 Victoria Street from listed Singaporean developer Chip Eng Seng for $64.8 million last month.

The deal attracted considerable attention in the market. The Singaporean seller doubled its money in just two years after gaining a planning permit under the previous state government.

A hiatus in the approval of planning permits after the change of government and market uncertainty over how readily new Planning Minister Richard Wynne will dispense permits have added a premium to good sites with permits.

Chip Eng Seng acquired the corner site – a 2927-square-metre parcel of the former Carlton & United brewery – from Grocon only two years ago for $32 million.

Through its Australian subsidiary, CES Victoria, the Singaporeans won approval for a 72-storey Elenberg Fraser-designed tower comprising 1035 apartments.

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Qantas743's picture

I have it on good authority that Hengyi are going ahead with the approved design, albeit with some minor modifications to the lower podium levels above the blue stone.

Apparently and understandably they don't want to "test the waters" with a new development application given the chances of approval would be much lower under the new government - and that was what I was told specifically.

In any case, they're definitely plugging along with it so expect another beauty to begin rising soon!

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3000's picture

This proposal is garbage.

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Melbman's picture

Its not amazing, but its certainly not "garbage".

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3000's picture

It's almost laughable how much it overpowers the surrounding area.

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Dean's picture

Really? There are a number of 150m and 200m+ buildings that are existing and now UC virtually across the street. It's a CCZ. This the place for such buildings.

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Melbourne_Fragments's picture

It's not in the CCZ

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