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CBD | 278 Little Lonsdale Street | 59L | 181m | Residential

Mark Baljak's picture
#1

DTPLI
2014003555 24/09/2014
Demolition and construction of a mixed use development comprising of residential apratments with ground floor retail teneancies and associated basement carparking

Brady Group plans 59-level apartment tower

The three-level Phillips Shirts building in Little Lonsdale Street is set to be transformed into a 59-level residential apartment tower under plans submitted by local developer Brady Group.
A $60 million tower planned for the small 702-square-metre site will have 314 apartments and 158 sqm of retail space on the ground floor, planning documents show.
Most of the existing brick building that sits on the corner of Zevenboom Lane will be demolished to make way for the development, although the facade that fronts Little Lonsdale Street will be kept and incorporated in the new building.
Brady Group bought the Phillips Shirt site in May this year for $15 million.
The development company was founded by Irish-born Tony Brady more than two decades ago and includes among current projects 524 units over 69 levels in the Vision apartment building on the site of the old Stork Hotel at 500 Elizabeth Street.
The group is one of Melbourne's most prolific developers, building more than 20 large-scale city residential developments over the past two decades.
It recently completed two similar-sized towers on neighbouring sites next to Phillips Shirts.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/business/brady-group-plans-59level-apartment-tower...

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Melbourne_Fragments's picture

Bad outcome if the Zeverboom lane bits are demolished, given they are actually the oldest parts of the site (Edwardian compared to more recent facade) and form an entire lanescape connecting with Heape court. seriously why can't the developers see the merit in retaining the character brick as part of the development, maybe with holes punched in to create a whole new laneway precinct?
Also I imagine no room left for Philips Shirts and any of the interior that has been extremely popular in the last few Melbourne Open Houses.
Still will have to see if the design is good and something interesting is done in the laneway

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Bilby's picture

This is too big on a fine-grain laneway site - and the destruction of yet another historic lane way in Melbourne is, frankly, not worth it compared with the outcome - just another high rise apartment tower. The market is already oversupplied and we are destroying the last vestiges of heritage in the CBD for it - on balance, this is a very poor outcome indeed and ruining the very qualities that make Melbourne unique and liveable. Phillips Shirts building and its lane way envelope should be in a heritage overlay and should be height controlled - there is only one Zeverboom lane, but there are thousands of potential high-rise infill sites across Melbourne and inner-Melbourne - this represents bad planning for the future of the city.

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johnproctor's picture

keep the bricks!

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johnproctor's picture

and given its CCZ and ministerial approval there are no rights of appeal or submission for average joes.

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Mark Baljak's picture

Peddle Thorp images from planning app dated September 2014

site

renders

elevations

typical floor

shadow diagram

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Ryan Seychell's picture

I actually like this design, much better than a lot of the other stuff they've put out.
That said, it looks odd next to Melbourne Star for some reason, I think the podium looks too big, needs to be set back at bit more.

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Riddlz's picture

If those orange/brown sections were painted white instead it would look better, almost as if it were an extension of the existing towers.

Nevertheless, I think the same of this tower as I do with all other of Brady's existing towers(that I'm aware of); unimpressive and bland.

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Melbourne_Fragments's picture

Hardly worth keeping the facade if you're going to white-wash all historical connection from it, and even render over brickwork, not to mention the total demolition of the entire Edwardian laneway, Laurence Dragomir's analysis on the homepage seems about right, this is the perfect spot for a decent rooftop addition and proper laneway activiation to add the the city, not generic apartment balconies and another bland Peddle Thorp box
Can we as a city afford to lose what remaining laneway fabric and potential like this we have?

This site also forms an environment and backing to Heape Court, and in turn the Guildford lane area around the corner.

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3000's picture

What a depressing outcome. Laneways neees special consideration in Melbourne and what could've been a potentially good activation is a really bad tower.
Developers need start thinking about what made people want to come visit and live in cbd in the first place. Hint: it's not that cheapness of it that's for sure.

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Peter Maltezos's picture

This one doesn't work for me. no

Mediocre design at best and the wrong site for this skyscraper, it just looks squashed in.

I hope it gets knocked back.

I collect, therefore I am.
thecollectormm.com.au

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Qantas743's picture

I don't mind it but yes, I do think it will probably be knocked back.

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Bilby's picture

Say no, City of Melbourne. And let's hope that VCAT say no too. If not - over to you, Mr. Wynne - Melbourne needs a planning minister who actually understands what makes Melbourne great. Our lane ways are our stamp of greatness - demolishing this is akin to paving the canals in Venice. Once it's gone, sure, you still have a city, but what kind of city will it be on the world stage?

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Adrian's picture

I agree with you guys on the location and height this time. I think it's one tower too many for that area which is starting to make it Hong Kong like.

I don't necessarily agree with you guys on Zevenboom Lane being 'destroyed'. How is creating new retail space and retaining the old facade making it worse than it currently is - a completely unused laneway that in the 13 years I've lived in that street only ever taken a leak in ? They're not actually removing it completely ala Elliot Ln with Central Equity, or taking away existing retail and venues and replacing with a loading dock (Clarendon Ln) ..

Yes in an ideal world a white knight would step in to purchase the site and retain it's lower rise character and actually develop it into something decent - on that I definitely agree. But such developers are sadly rare (looks like The Palace in St.Kilda is the next to go thanks to the Chinese again) so if this has to go ahead at least their doing something to activate a lane that is currently dead, even if it's not an ideal outcome.

Having said all that I'm happy if this get's knocked back - but I fear the 'height is evil above all else' policy of the CoM etc. will care not about the ground level amenity of that area just happy this isn't above 200m - they will probably approve this and knock back the more suitably located Queen & Lt.Lonsdale St tower up the road because it's well over 200m

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Adrian's picture

I agree with you guys on the location and height this time. I think it's one tower too many for that area which is starting to make it Hong Kong like.

I don't necessarily agree with you guys on Zevenboom Lane being 'destroyed'. How is creating new retail space and retaining the old facade making it worse than it currently is - a completely unused laneway that in the 13 years I've lived in that street only ever taken a leak in ? They're not actually removing it completely ala Elliot Ln with Central Equity, or taking away existing retail and venues and replacing with a loading dock (Caledonian Ln) ..

Yes in an ideal world a white knight would step in to purchase the site and retain it's lower rise character and actually develop it into something decent - on that I definitely agree. But such developers are sadly rare (looks like The Palace in St.Kilda is the next to go thanks to the Chinese again) so if this has to go ahead at least their doing something to activate a lane that is currently dead, even if it's not an ideal outcome.

Having said all that I'm happy if this get's knocked back - but I fear the 'height is evil above all else' policy of the CoM etc. will care not about the ground level amenity of that area just happy this isn't above 200m - they will probably approve this and knock back the more suitably located Queen & Lt.Lonsdale St tower up the road because it's well over 200m

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Melbourne_Fragments's picture

Laneway destroyed in the sense that any character and heritage it has (with the historic brick buildings) is going to knocked down for concrete and glass sheer height and a loading bay

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johnproctor's picture

with 180m of tower blocking any chance of sunlight or even blue sky visibility in their forever.

'its better than Elliot and Caledonian but thats still not very good.

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3000's picture

Curious as to what you mean by "Hong Kong like". I think this is a terrible proposal and hope it gets knocked back.

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Adrian's picture

Actually having another walk past the site on weekend I have no issue with the tower itself or it's height.

It's so close to Melbourne Star (or Sky whichever is which lol) it's almost like an extension of it anyway. If the two towers were built and joined together I don't think anyone would care (well they would but you know). I don't think it's gonna make that much difference to the current amount of lighting at street level (which I'm fine with) which is the main issue - and I do like the A108-esque striping :)

I do agree about the laneway though if the retail isn't going to wrap around all the way towards the end of the laneway and only just on the corner then that's a serious issue. Trouble is the existing Phillips building doesn't have any frontage to the laneway without major structural change anyway - so any kind of re-devevlopment would have to factor that if Zevenboom Lane is ever to have any actual life created in it.

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3000's picture

I think this would look better with about 20-30 meters chopped of it tbh.

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Dean's picture

It's a little hard to read but i get 199.62 to the top of LMR and 13.62 at ground level.

So it's 186m.

Could someone please change the title unless ive read it wrong. :-)

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Melbourne_Fragments's picture

It wouldnt be too difficult to punch some doorways into the Zeverboom lane facade Adrian, without ruining integrity of the whole brick facade, there are already shuttered up windows lining the whole laneway that could be extended down and made into small tenancies

Same thing was recently done in Niagara Lane and it works really well

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Adrian's picture

Fair enough - in that case it should be opposed as it is now and Brady made to add retail all the way around deep into the laneway with any services blank walls covered up with some street art or something - then it will be a good outcome

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Bilby's picture

Yes, that would indeed be a good outcome, Adrian. Why can't we have genuinely good outcomes in the Melbourne CBD then? The answer is simple - the planning scheme simply doesn't mandate or encourage good outcomes. I hope you're listening, Minister.

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Mark Baljak's picture

Deano raises a point. Does everyone consider height to roof or LMR? Generally I'll take the height to roof

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Adrian's picture

Definitely LMR its the highest structural part of the building ie. one that cannot be changed by simply adding stick - which is my basic definition of offifical height as opposed to the CTBUH's laughable stick idea ..

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