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CBD | 280 Queen St | 220m | 80L | Mixed use

Mark Baljak's picture
#1

Approved plans for a quality design, Peddle Thorp have done well

west/south

podium

ground plan

east

north

minimal car spaces = good result

i'll put the dated plans up later

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Alastair Taylor's picture

far better than the random render that was floating about a few month's back.

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CM's picture

Massive glass structure in a time of climate change (increased heat) and a desire for sustainability (reduced energy use). Where is the justification in that? Really boring street interface - east images notable in particular. Is that car parking and air conditioning? Podium level not much better. I'm sorry but I find this to be just another example of really poor consideration of urban planning. A building in the centre of the city should consider its surroundings there is no evidence that this one does.

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

How large are the office floorplates? I am guessing they would be around 750 square metres.

Does anybody think that 46 levels of office space with less than 1000 square metres on each level has any realistic chance of actually getting built?

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Chris Peska's picture

Observe. Design. Build. Live.

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Chris Peska's picture

CM, you do realize that a lot of sustainable buildings use glass to increase natural light (less electricity for lighting) and use shades based on the buildings orientation to the sun to limit the effect of heat to the interior? Good recent examples of this are the two recently RMIT buildings (Design Hub designed by Sean Godsell and Swanston Academic Building designed by Lyons Architects) which use large amounts of glass. I guess a question I have you is, if this wasn’t a 200m high office tower and was a 12 storey campus style office tower (re: ANZ headquarters in Docklands), would you still have the same concerns about the amount of glass used? In fact, the ANZ headquarters has far more glass used in its construction compared to this proposal and it is one of the most sustainable office buildings in Australia, but because its not really tall, its ok? Hrmm…

Using your logic of “lots of glass equals bad for sustainability”, you would prefer a large concrete structure with thick walls and small windows to reduce the impact of heat… have you considered the environmental impact of the production of materials such as concrete?? Could someone (Lawrence) confirm my logic?

In the end, this is the first 200m+ office tower approved for the CBD since the 1990’s and to be honest, it does consider its surroundings quite well… from memory, Melbourne Central (tall office building with lots and lots of glass) a block away to the east and Republic tower to the north.

Observe. Design. Build. Live.

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Laurence Dragomir's picture

The embodied energy (the energy consumed in the production of the building material) of glass is 12.7MJ/kg vs 2.0MJ/kg for precast comcret (in-situ is 1.9).

Glazing is a key element in good passive solar design however there are other things to consider such as orientation, glazing type, amount, shading etc.

Concrete in lieu of glazing on the western facade would be preferable to limit solar gain, however aesthetics also comes into play.

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Alastair Taylor's picture

Another point is how much energy will be harnessed by the sun through the PV film expected to be incorporated into the North/West facades.

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Mark Baljak's picture

I'd say the towers facade would be lucky to have 50% glaze versus precast/metal. The podium is visually OK but not activated enough. If this tower is a case of poor urban planning then i guess it's not the only one in that boat - most contemporary towers are on par with this one. All comes back to government planning ethos and enforcement during the approval process, they could have demanded more from developer/architect if they deemed it necessary.

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Mark Baljak's picture

And the superseded plans.

 

 

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Mark Baljak's picture

AFR
Chinese developer wins huge permit for Melbourne CBD site
LARRY SCHLESINGER

>> A mainland Chinese developer has bought a 1290-square-metre corner site in Melbourne’s central business district and has been granted a permit for a 50-storey office tower rising 205 metres.

The Kliger Partners building on the corner of Queen and Little Lonsdale Streets in the Melbourne CBD sold for $23.9 million.

A planning permit for a $190 million office building with ground floor retail was issued by Victorian Planning Minister ­Matthew Guy in February.

>> It is understood that the unnamed buyer of 280 Queen Street has interests in several existing smaller-scale development projects in Melbourne. However a 50-level-plus development would be the largest project they have done to date.

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Mark Baljak's picture

Peddle Thorp on their website are showing this to be mixed use, with residential now included

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Qantas743's picture

Was just thinking about this one the other day.

With 150 Queen now uncertain, it would be good to get something else up of a similar scale in this part of the CBD.

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Mark Baljak's picture

revised design with apartments at 210m

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Ryan Seychell's picture

Brady Group push to develop 80-level Queen Street tower
November 12, 2014 - 12:15AM
Simon Johanson

One of the Melbourne's more enduring family-owned development companies has lodged plans for a soaring 80-level city skyscraper, adding to the long list of 43 proposals to be considered by whatever party forms government after this month's election.

Local developer Brady Group, which has been building units in the city for more than 25 years, is banking on continued heat in the apartment market, submitting a proposal for a thin 220-metre tower on a relatively small 1290-square-metre site at 280 Queen Street.

The three-storey rendered brick office building on the site partially leased to Kliger Partners Lawyers will be demolished to make way for a $150 million tower with a blue curtain wall finish and 589 apartments.

The majority of dwellings - 287 - will have two bedrooms, with 242 one bedders and 36 three bedroom apartments. The tower will also have 14 penthouses on its top levels.

The property was purchased by Chinese national Xuebin Wu for $23.9 million last year.

Mr Wu holds a third portion of the holding company which lodged the plans for the site, suggesting an initial joint capital venture with, or buyout, by Brady.

A Brady Group spokesman said Mr Wu was no longer involved in the project. "It will be a Brady Group development," he said. "Work will start in about 12 months."

The site formerly had a permit for a 57-level commercial building with ground floor retail that was issued in 2013.

http://www.theage.com.au/business/brady-group-push-to-develop-80level-qu...

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Mark Baljak's picture

80 levels / 220 metres ??

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

Maybe 80 levels including basement car parking levels? Hopefully the design will be better than Brady's other projects

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Bilby's picture

Wouldn't be hard.

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Ryan Seychell's picture

New Peddle Thorpe design, 272.8m RL. Bit more interesting than the usual Brady proposals.

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Adrian's picture

With a roughly 20m ground RL makes this another for the 250m club .. Which is pretty huge for the area !

Can you post a render of the new design ?

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

Lowest entrance is is 19m so 253.8m above ground.

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Mark Baljak's picture

one for new years day

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Adrian's picture

Happy New Year Mark & Everyone !!

Wow 'mini' Eureka - not bad certainly another step up in design not to mention height for Brady.

They've maximized the setbacks for the site as well which bodes well for approval, but cripes how close is it to the Fabrik tower proposal next door ? It's almost an optical illusion that the building appears to sit behind it, but in reality the left hand side of the Brady tower would literally be touching the face of Fabrik (tho maybe if there's no side windows on Fabrik as seems apparent in the renders this might actually be acceptable ?

If I didn't know better I'd swear the building actually tapers away from the podium and leans back towards rear of picture, the way the roof appears to be wafer thin and aligned with the rear of Fabrik, like a wedge shape.

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Mark Baljak's picture

representative materials

elevations

ground

renders

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MelbourneGuy's picture

Nice variation in design with this one.

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3000's picture

So is this no longer an office tower? Damn, was looking forward to something to join Rialto.

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