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CBD | 466 Collins Street | Collins House | 61L | 204m | Mixed Use

Ryan Seychell's picture
#1

New mixed use tower proposed for Collins Street, 54 levels, with 13 levels of premium office space.

 

Herald Sun article: Grollo family proposes pencil-thin tower for CBD

JOHN MASANAUSKAS HERALD SUN JUNE 14, 2013 12:52PM

A SUPER-THIN tower using a revolutionary design has been proposed for a prime CBD site. A member of the Grollo family is behind the push for a 54-storey office and apartment building at 464 Collins St. Dubbed by some as the pencil-thin tower, it would feature one continuous structure of reinforced concrete and look like cutting edge buildings in cities such as New York and Hong Kong. 

 

Read more: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/grollo-family-proposes-pencilt...

 

 

Building currently on the site - facade will be incorporated into the development:

 

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Mark Baljak's picture

"Dubbed by some as the pencil-thin tower, it would feature one continuous structure of reinforced concrete and look like cutting edge buildings in cities such as New York and Hong Kong."

or most other buildings in Melbourne for that matter....

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MelbourneGuy's picture

Interesting concept but 'cutting edge' design, I don't think so!

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Mark Baljak's picture

let the PR blitz begin

AFR excerps
Pencil-slim tower to make its mark

Nick Lenaghan and Rebecca Thistleton

> It will be Australia’s tallest, most slender “pencil” tower yet and a forerunner for the next generation of super-skinny city buildings – but its facade will keep a piece of Melbourne’s history.

>The site is a mere 11 metres in frontage, 40 metres deep and hemmed in on two sides by neighbours. It seems an almost impossible feat and will produce a tower with a width-to-height, or aspect, ratio of 1:16. Anything above 1:10 is said to be skinny already.

>It means reinventing traditional tower construction, which is based on a central concrete core. Instead, the $200 million Makers Mark tower will be built inside out, moving the core to the perimeter walls and eliminating columns.

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

So 11 metres wide and 1:16 ratio = 176m

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Peter Maltezos's picture

Nice to see another mixed use proposal, but like most have said, the cutting edge design quote is a bit overboard.

Looks like a thin Optus House in the rendering above, nothing spectacular.

I collect, therefore I am.
thecollectormm.com.au

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Rohan Storey's picture

Wonder if the original ground level chamber will be retained, as well as the facade ?

Lookingupatbuildings

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Mark Baljak's picture

181.48m to parapet

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MelbourneGuy's picture

Anyone know of the start date for this one, or are they waiting for a certain number of apartments/pre-commitments to be sold before they start?

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Ryan Seychell's picture

hasn't been approved yet :)

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Fedsquared's picture

Looking at that render it looks (hopefully) like more that just the facade will be saved.

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Ryan Seychell's picture

Facade will be saved. The other side of the building is something i'd be more worried about.

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Andrew Mck's picture

Looks like a glass curtain wall on the east face and NOT a bare concret shaft wall which the earlier render had led me to believe.
So yes, very happy so far..

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Mark Baljak's picture

perspective

perspective

perspective

potential neighbouring development

design parallels/inspirations

interactive carpark design

cross section

changeable apt layout

1bed live/work loft

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

The western wall is an epic fail. Great concept but they really need a much more innovative solution to address the western wall of the building and Bates Smart designs really aren't that innovative or exciting.

So the tower is actually 15m wide because of the section cantilevering over the building on the corner?

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Mark Baljak's picture

yep

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Mark Baljak's picture

Ideally looking to go to market late next year

And the western wall will be addressed

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Laurence Dragomir's picture

Proposed revision to western boundary wall:

 

 

– The new proposed west facade seeks to provide greater activation, character, light and view amenity to the western boundary. The circular windows shown opposite are based on a prototypical 750mm window apperture. The windows are dispersed in a random pattern with a greater amount shown toward the top of the building to provide differentiated outlook and flexibility with internal planning. This strategy corresponds with the load bearing capacity of the buildings west facade and is designed to appear more ‘perforated’ toward the top. At night these elements provide a unique and surprising identity to the western boundary. A blue light is positioned at the top level to the northern and southern boundary to accent the buildings identity with a ‘Melbourne Blue’ colouration.

 

And proposed changes to interactive artwork to parking levels' facade:

 

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Ryan Seychell's picture

This one will be released for sales 1st quarter next year

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MelbourneGuy's picture

The revised podium is a lot better imo.

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Mark Baljak's picture

AFR
Grollo goes to market with skinny tower

NICK LENAGHAN

Prominent developer Lorenz Grollo has put his landmark ‘pencil tower’ project on Collins Street to the market as local and offshore players clamour for a place on the Melbourne city grid.

The $210 million project has been hailed a forerunner in the new generation of super-skinny towers that employ advanced techniques to raise tall buildings on narrow sites.

Mr Grollo gained a planning permit in February for the 55-level tower at 466 Collins Street and had planned to launch pre-sales by the end of the year.

With expertise already in skinny-tower construction, he had expected to start building next year.

Instead, the Grollo Equiset managing director has appointed CBRE to sell the property after being inundated with offers. Much of the interest has come from offshore players.

“We’ve had unsolicited approaches quite regularly,” Mr Grollo said.

“Melbourne has the attention of international developers. They all want to come here and participate.

“If they can buy sites with planning permits already then they will pay a premium for it.”

Designed by architects Bates Smart, the tower comprises strata title offices on its lower levels and 188 apartments higher up.

Standing on a postage stamp site of 483 square metres, the new tower will maintain the historic facade of the original three-storey Makers Mark building.

To protect apartment views, Mr Grollo had previously acquired air rights over an adjoining building. The site is expected to fetch $30 million or more. Nearby on the opposite side of Collins Street is the iconic Rialto Towers, which is half-owned by Lorenz Grollo’s family.

With co-investor the Kuwaiti-owned St Martins Properties, Grollo Equiset is preparing for $100 million upgrade, including new retail space constructed in the vast forecourt.

“That is our main asset and that is where we need to focus our attention,” Mr Grollo said.

“If other groups want to buy us out of development sites and give us part of our development profit upfront, we’d best look at it so we can redeploy capital to Rialto.”

Mr Grollo last month divested a $100 million residential project in inner-city North Melbourne, the Assembly, only days before launching it.

Three parties had vied to take over the 138-apartment project after it was approved.

Cbus Property, which also controls a large Collins Street site near Makers Mark, snapped up the North Melbourne project for $19 million, according to market sources.

Further down Collins Street, in the Docklands precinct, Mr Grollo is also working up plans for a $350 million office tower that straddles a historic former rail freight building at 710 Collins Street.

CBRE agent Mark Wizel, with ­colleagues Josh Rutman and Tom Tuxworth, is handling the Makers Mark property with its permit for a 28,000 sq m building.

“It provides the opportunity to deliver a truly remarkable project in an absolute blue chip location and ultimately the chance for a developer to write their own chapter of Collins Street history.”

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MelbourneGuy's picture

I didn't realise there was so much demand for our properties.

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Mark Baljak's picture

A potential super site by the look of it

AFR
Suleman sells down as developers circle

NICK LENAGHAN
Private investor and fresh flower mogul Sam Suleman is ­divesting a $60 million Collins Street property as development activity surges along Melbourne’s main ­business thoroughfare.

The 15-level office tower at 468-478 Collins Street is the third central Melbourne asset the Suleman family has put into the market in recent months amid a flurry of development-driven deals across the city.

The Collins Street building has 10,500 square metres of net lettable area, including a retail redevelopment along the street frontage.

It stands on a large 1469-square-metre plot of land at the fast-growing western end of Collins Street. Just next door to the Suleman property is the historic three-storey Makers Mark building, where a 55-level super-thin tower has been proposed.

Developer Lorenz Grollo opted to put 464-466 Collins Street to the ­market this month after receiving offers, following planning approval for the $210 million office and ­residential project.

Investors can now consider the neighbouring properties a potential consolidation play along the tightly held boulevard.

Already, the precinct around the Suleman property is humming with plans and projects under way.

On the opposite side of Collins Street, Mr Grollo is pressing ahead with a $100 million redevelopment of iconic Rialto Towers, which is 50 per cent held by his family.

Listed developer Mirvac has taken a prominent position in the neighbourhood, acquiring the historic Olderfleet Buildings at 477 Collins Street, where a $500 million redevelopment has been mooted.

Also nearby, super fund developer Cbus Property has control of a vast 6000-square-metre plus site, where it is working up plans for a $1 billion mixed use project on the corner of William and Collins streets.

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Garmatt's picture

Collins Street is the country's most awesome street.

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Bilby's picture

So the tower design and permit may no longer be relevant to this site if consolidated?

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Mark Baljak's picture

no amalgamation with the site next door, this one will probably be built

Makers Mark

A listed Singaporean developer is making its first foray into the Australian property market, paying a speculated $28.5 million for a 483-square-metre Collins Street site with a ministerial-approved permit for a landmark 55-level office and apartment tower.
The Makers Mark building at 464-466 Collins Street is being offloaded by Equiset Grollo, which bought it for $10.5 million late 2012 then lobbied the state government to approve a super high-density proposal unveiled seven months later.
When the building traded 10 years ago, it was worth just $3.5 million.
Equiset's proposed $200 million tower would be configured with 37 levels of apartments. The balance of the building includes 3000 square metres of office space and a 70-bay car park.
CBRE's Mark Wizel, Josh Rutman and Tom Tuxworth represented Equiset.
Also this week Singapore's Figtree Holdings bought a residential development site at 293-299 La Trobe Street for $14 million. The Bennetts Lane Jazz Club site also sold to a China-based developer for more than $10 million.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/business/singapore-developer-out-to-make-his-mark-...

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