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CBD | Avant | 54-64 A'Beckett Street Melbourne | 172m | Residential

Fedsquared's picture
#1

Big one. Should be pushing 300m.

Application No. 2010026164A

Demolition and construction of a mixed-use multi-storey tower comprising accommodation (residential apartments and serviced apartments) and ground floor retail premises (other than adult sex bookshop, department store, hotel, supermarket and tavern).

Extension of 34 levels to existing permit (81 level development, plus 1 basement level and 2 levels of roof plant) and construction of an additional 284 dwellings

Aspial Group

Existing permit is for 49 storey building

Site is the one circled in red

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Mark Baljak's picture

funny when 200 metres + is the norm these days

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Ryan Seychell's picture

Unbelievable

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Andrew's picture

So, carrying on from the SSC conversion from three years ago, is the red brick building part of the site or not?

That street has changed now, RMIT SAB is on the corner and the new temporary park/basketball courts have gone in on the old gravel carpark between this site and SAB. MY80 has topped out directly west of this site. Things are shaping up, hopefully some of the heritage in the street is retained with the red brick building, even if it is incorporated to the new plans.

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Qantas743's picture

PANS-OPS are only around 250-260m there.

FFS these flight paths HAVE TO GO!!

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Mark Baljak's picture

^^ big deal, 260m is enough

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MelbourneGuy's picture

Speaking of flight paths, it beats me how Hong Kong managed all those years with planes flying into their original airport.

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

The approved tower only replaced the building at 58-64 A'Beckett Street. The new plan includes the adjoining site at 54-56 A'Beckett Street.

I am not sure that replacing an approved tower with a whole new design that is almost twice as high is a planning permit amendment.

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Qantas743's picture
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Ryan Seychell's picture

76 levels, 233m. Designed by Elenberg Fraser. One of their best designs yet in my opinion. Reminds me a bit of Hearst Tower in a way, the lower half anyway.

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Ryan Seychell's picture

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Melbourne_Fragments's picture

such an easy job to retain both historical facades instead of a boring glass wall at street level, but EF never have any imagination in that regard

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

That would probably be a decision made by the client I'm not sure you can blame EF.

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Paul_D's picture

Love the "crumpling down" treatment they've styled the facade with. It's a very elegant outcome in my opinion and actually quite sculptural. I'd be very happy to see this one rise.

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Mark Baljak's picture

yep, epic design

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Kycon's picture

Elenberg Fraser have a purple fetish nowadays..

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Andrew's picture

Great design, boring street level.

As Ryan said, reminds me of the Hearst tower but without the heritage integration.

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Andrew's picture

And what seems like a goal to design the northern CBD all on their own, at least those three or four blocks around Elizabeth Street.

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Peter Maltezos's picture

Ideally they should have retained the brick building in the design, an excellent modern skyscraper design anyway. yessmileyyes

I collect, therefore I am.
thecollectormm.com.au

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Bilby's picture

Yep, an epic design and epic heritage fail at street level. We are losing two significant buildings here - a very rare 1915 car showroom and the Edwardian factory: They are both in the City North Heritage Review for those interested.

http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/BuildingandPlanning/Planning/planningsch...

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Mark Baljak's picture

^^ give me this then

I concede the podium is weak and the existing buildings are worth maintaining. Do you concede that as a tower it's unique and visually impressive?

As Nick said above it's likely designed to the clients brief, if they have no regard for the existing buildings...

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Bilby's picture

Yes, this is certainly one of the better EF buildings I have seen - mind you, I find much of their work uninspiring. I don't have a problem with the tower design as such, from what has been revealed of it so far. The thing is, there will be many more opportunities to employ great architects and produce outstanding buildings in Melbourne in future, but once these two historic structures are gone - they are gone forever. Our Victorian, Edwardian and other unique historic architecture will never return - we can't change our minds as a city and revive them in 20 or 50 years time (nor should we). These buildings are part of a living culture, as is the ongoing change and development of the city - why we can't have both in this culture is utterly beyond me. There are no technical reasons why we can't meaningfully retain our remaining heritage buildings in Melbourne, while developing the sites of lesser importance all around them to their maximum use value to the city. So yes, let's build those outstanding contemporary structures, but let's do it with a view to the bigger picture with regard to the kind of city we will be left with once the dust settles from all these unnecessary demolitions of of the last pieces in the jigsaw of old Melbourne.

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Andrew's picture

Send the architects and the developer a letter with your views, who knows, they might take it into consideration or at least attempt to incorporate a section of the existing facade.

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Bilby's picture

I have written to EF before re: 36-40 La Trobe Street, without so much as receiving an acknowledgement of my email. Ironically, the real estate agents are now touting 36-40 La Trobe as "...Situated at the east-end of the city's historic La Trobe St precinct" (see link below). Yes, it will be when it's built - albeit minus the last significant 19th century livery and stables building in the Melbourne CBD, since they are knocking it over to build on top of the ruins of said "historic precinct". EF pride themselves on their adaptive reuse of the old Goods Shed in the Docklands, so what's up with their support of the destruction of so many of Melbourne's best remaining historic buildings? Why claim the honours for good work done at one site while supporting the erasure of Melbourne's heritage elsewhere? I know that EF are no longer the architects on this job, but as far as I understand, that has nothing to do with their concerns about working on a project that would result in the loss of a significant heritage site. If anyone knows otherwise, I would be interested to hear about it.

http://www.realestate.com.au/property-apartment-vic-melbourne-115469843

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Mark Baljak's picture

Is it not a fundamental failure by City of Melbourne or State to provide the necessary, crystal clear overlay.

Architects and developers will do what they do, why not give them definitive parameters to work in - what must be retained/potentially demolished?

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Bilby's picture

Assume you mean this is a fundamental failure, Mark? I would certainly agree there.

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Pages

Development & Planning

Friday, December 2, 2016 - 06:00
Almost three years to the day of Urban Melbourne covering Eq. Tower's planning application , ICD Property's 62-storey tower at 127-141 A'Beckett Street has held its topping out ceremony. The event held onsite yesterday coincided with the first round of residents settling on apartments within the Elenberg Fraser designed scraper.

Policy, Culture & Opinion

Monday, October 31, 2016 - 09:00
The New Urban Agenda was officially adopted in Quito, Ecuador in the last plenary of the Habitat III conference. The agenda provides a 20-year “roadmap” to guide sustainable urban development globally. The text of the New Urban Agenda itself was agreed well before Habitat III at the UN General Assembly in September, during an extraordinary informal negotiation session that lasted for more than 30 hours.

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Visual Melbourne

Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 17:00
Melbourne’s architectural landscape is a wonderful juxtaposition of modern and Victorian architecture. Although the CBD has been peppered with many skyscrapers, its historical structures have won Melbourne the title of “Australia’s most European city”.

Transport & Design

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 08:30
The recent approval of Sterling Global 's mixed-use tower at 383 La Trobe Street adds to the influx of towers with international influence leaving their mark not only on Melbourne's skyline, but the city's streetscapes. The $700 million mixed-use tower, a collaboration between French design architect Ateliers Jean Nouvel and local Australian executive architect Architectus, has been designed with people at its core.

Sustainability & Environment

Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 12:00
Timber mid-rise buildings are becoming the preferred choice for many stakeholders in Melbourne, due to a combination of factors, including cost-effectiveness, liveability, ease and efficiency of construction. Within the recent National Construction Code change, Deemed-To-Satisfy provisions allow mid-rise timber construction for buildings up to 25 metres “effective height” (typically, eight storeys).