Advertisement
18 posts in this thread / 0 new
Last post

DOCKLANDS | Voyager | Wharf's Entrance | 43L | 138m | Residential

Ryan Seychell's picture
#1






Back to top
Mark Baljak's picture

A little squat in the plans

Finish early 2019 at this stage

not too shabby

Back to top
Adam Ford's picture

Voyager really is an excellent name for several hundred tonnes of utterly immobile concrete. lol

And isn't Yarra's Edge the greatest waste of CBD riverfrontage in any comparable sized city anywhere?

Back to top
Michael Berquez's picture

No

Back to top
Melbman's picture

YE is actually a well executed design overall.

Its mix of towers, low-rise and open space has come together quite well. The only let down is transport links further down towards the western part of the site, but it is hamstrung in what it can do to fix that.

When you consider that the area around this site will be bulked up with new developments, keeping the waterfront lower-rise was actually a great decision.

Back to top
Dean's picture

I agree in regard to the name. I think they should have gone for 'Cynical Bore Tower' @ Wharf's Entrance instead.

Back to top
Adam Ford's picture

Right, so we reckon using all those acres of low rise housing with giant towers sticking out of the middle of it in the middle of a public transport wasteland is what riverfront land CBD-side land is for? The place is an eyesore enclave for the overly superannuated. Again right on OUR riverfront.

I see no hint of cynicism on behalf of the architect. If you want boredom, spend a day at Yarra's Edge.

Back to top
Bilby's picture

The wharves along northbank are almost entirely dead on the weekend - and that's unlikely to change regardless of landscaping improvements, because the river frontage is in near permanent shade. A good outcome in urban planning terms?

Back to top
Garmatt's picture

What? That one wharf that is actually derelict on the north bank?? The one that has not even been redeveloped yet?
I don't understand your point.

That said, I doubt, even after redevelopment that northbank wharf area will be a success as it is hemmed in by that bloody awful freeway that cuts through Docklands and over the Charles Grimes bridge. The rest of the land there is taken up with the Mission to Seaman, which is an OK heritage building but hardly activities the street, and a whopping great multi-story carpark. Mmmmm - appealing!

Unless a brave and costly decision is made to (a) get rid of the carpark, and (b) sink the freeway under ground, this area will always be a dead zone, and neither of those will happen probably. Pity really, as there is a very nice pedestrian bridge at the moment that effectively leads to nowhere. Bizarre planning all round, really.

Back to top
Bilby's picture

I was referring to Australia Wharf along the front of the ANZ Centre, Garmatt. It's a substantial piece of public open space that is usually in the shade due to the lack of building setback here. The rest of your points I would agree with - except that Mission to Seaman is a bit more than "Ok" as heritage buildings go, simply because of the great uses it has been put to in recent years, the public access and cultural events it hosts - you can't say that about many spaces in Docklands right now.

Back to top
Riddlz's picture
Back to top
Mark Baljak's picture

looks to be about the spot

Back to top
Michael Berquez's picture

It will look tall out there on it's own

Back to top
pdoff's picture

This may have hit construction. From what I could see in my brief drive-by from the street in peak hour, there's a couple of piling rigs at work.

Back to top
Grampians's picture

shouldn't be private residential low rise...civic, retail, leisure etc...public...would all be better...now it will be an exclusive wanker enclave IN PERPETUITY!!

Back to top
Mark Baljak's picture

Mirvac gives away $59,400 as apartment competition heats up

Apartments with city views over the water in one of property giant Mirvac's developments are being offered to buyers at a whopping $59,400 discount on their $495,000 advertised price.

Steep discounting in the apartment sector came to light last Friday after a mystery home-buying spree conducted by researchers at investment bank Citi.

Citi's researchers didn't identify the developer offering big discounts, but BusinessDay has found a raft of similar incentives at Mirvac's Forge apartment project in Melbourne.

Mirvac, one of Australia's largest property developers, is offering potential buyers $11,000 of furniture, a full refund of stamp duty fees and a 5 per cent rental guarantee for 12 months, in effect a saving of 12.5 per cent if they buy in the building.

When asked why it was discounting its apartments so heavily, Mirvac responded that its Yarra's Edge development, which includes the Forge building, had low vacancy rates and a long-term average capital growth.

"The Forge tower is approximately 80 per cent sold and has exceeded its FY17 settlement target ahead of program," Mirvac said.

http://www.theage.com.au/business/property/mirvac-gives-away-59400-as-ap...

Back to top
Qantas743's picture

Is this one any closer to starting?

Back to top
theboynoodle's picture

"When asked why it was discounting its apartments so heavily, Mirvac responded that its Yarra's Edge development, which includes the Forge building, had low vacancy rates and a long-term average capital growth."

That's the most amazing non-answer to a different question I've ever seen. I can't believe the paper printed that without comment.

What we're probably seeing here is solid evidence that property taxes (etc) are paid by the seller, and not the buyer. The upcoming changes affecting overseas and investor purchasers are not going to push overall the cost of units up.. rather they will shift how the total cost of purchase is split between the recipients.

Mirvac know that the value of their units (and all the other developers) has taken a hit, and they're applying that discount now in order to dress up a market adjustment as something else.

I wonder who commissioned that survey?

Back to top

Development & Planning

Wednesday, December 13, 2017 - 12:00
The swirl of development activity in Footscray has found another gear as new projects are submitted for approval, or are on the verge of beginning construction. Two separate planning applications have been advertised by Maribyrnong City Council; their subsequent addition to the Urban Melbourne Project Database has seen the overall number of apartment developments within Footscray in development swell to 40.

Policy, Culture & Opinion

Monday, November 20, 2017 - 12:00
The marriage of old and new can be a difficult process, particularly when the existing structure has intrinsic heritage value. In previous times Fitzroy's 237 Napier Street served as the home of furniture manufacturer C.F. Rojo and Sons. Taking root during 1887, Christobel Rojo oversaw operations though over time the site would become home to furniture manufacturer Thonet.

Advertisement

Visual Melbourne

Friday, August 25, 2017 - 07:00
The former site of John Batman's home, Batman's Hill is entering the final stages of its redevelopment. Collins Square's final tower has begun its skyward ascent, as has Lendlease's Melbourne Quarter Commercial and Residential precinct already. Melbourne Quarter's first stage is at construction and involves a new 12-storey home for consultancy firm Arup along with a skypark.

Transport & Design

Friday, December 15, 2017 - 11:00
Infrastructure Victoria unveiled a new round of research into its larger programme of work dealing with managing transport demand. The authority contracted Arup and KPMG to produce the Melbourne Activity Based Model (MABM) and while it is new, it is considered fit for purpose in the strategic context.

Sustainability & Environment

Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 12:00
Cbus Property's office development for Medibank at 720 Bourke Street in Docklands recently became the first Australian existing property to receive a WELL Certification, Gold Shell and Core rating. The WELL rating goes beyond sustainable building features with a greater focus on the health and well-being of a building's occupants.