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FISHERMANS BEND | General News and Discussion

Ryan Seychell's picture
#1

There's a few articles and other general information flying around, so probably easier to have a dedicated Fisherman's Bend thread

Fishermans Bend set for major expansion with new 'employment precinct'

April 17, 2015 - 12:18PM
Benjamin Preiss

The Fishermans Bend residential development in Melbourne's inner-south is about to take in a new swathe of land, with the formation of an expansive "employment precinct". The state's Planning Minister Richard Wynne announced on Friday that the area will expand from 250 to 455 hectares to accommodate a fifth precinct within the Fishermans Bend Urban Renewal Area.

Mr Wynne said the changes would impose new height restrictions of 40 storeys and allow space for schools and public transport, which were lacking from plans put in place by the previous government. Located about one kilometre south-west of Melbourne's CBD, Fishermans Bend was identified as an urban renewal area in July 2012 and rezoned as part of an expanded Capital City Zone.

The rezoning expanded the Capital City Zone by more than 50 per cent. The government expects that 80,000 people will live in the precinct, which stretches from Fishermans Bend to the area behind Southbank, by 2050. Mr Wynne said transport in the precinct was a "fundamental" issue that would need to be addressed. He said public transport would be "front and centre" of the development.

http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/fishermans-bend-set-for-major-expansio...

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Ryan Seychell's picture

GMH to start selling off chunks of Fishermans Bend April 18, 2015 Marc Pallisco

A GMH spokesman said it will sell the Fishermans Bend site down in pieces, starting with some disused portions, in a campaign to launch after July. The site is more valuable sold in small portions, at affordable price points where there is a greater pool of buyers.

Following GMH ceasing production in Australia in 2017, it is expected vacated Fishermans Bend buildings will be restored as boutique home-office spaces. The area has been cited as a "new Cremorne" by agents familiar with both inner-city neighbourhoods.

Read More: http://www.theage.com.au/business/gmh-to-start-selling-off-chunks-of-fis...

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Mark Baljak's picture

link to two current planning apps for FB - http://www.portphillip.vic.gov.au/april-2015-meetingsagendas.htm

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Mark Baljak's picture

In what is believed to be Fishermans Bend's biggest development site sale, a consortium of local and offshore builders is paying a speculated $42 million for an industrial property a stone's throw from Southbank.

And in a smaller inner south trade, local builder Mario Salvo is paying $6.3 million for a Hancock Street block abutting the West Gate Freeway.

In the bigger deal, the Carlins Automotive Auctioneers site at 6-78 Buckhurst Street is trading just months after former planning minister Matthew Guy approved that the 9000-square-metre block be replaced with four residential skyscrapers rising between 25 and 38 levels.

Carlins sought ministerial approval for its 1023-unit village about 12 months after Mr Guy rezoned some 240 hectares of Fishermans Bend land to Capital City 1; the same zone which covers CBD sites (and which allows for high-density development).

Last month, the Andrews government expanded the Fishermans Bend development zone, adding a 205-hectare "employment precinct" to complement what will be four residential suburbs: Lorimer, Wirraway, Sandridge and Montague, where the Carlins site sits.

Montague, being closest to the CBD, Docklands and Southbank, is considered Fishermans Bend's most valuable pocket.

The Carlins deal comes six months after another developer paid more than $30 million for a collection of factories covering 1.9 hectares in Plummer Street, Wirraway.

http://www.theage.com.au/business/consortium-buys-42m-fishermans-bend-si...

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Mark Baljak's picture

After a near-halt in major Fishermans Bend proposals since the state government change last November, the owner of a low-rise office in Montague has created a residential development scheme covering its 753 square metre block.

The proposed Interlandi & Mantesso Architects building would rise about 30 levels from 51-65 Buckhurst Street, a tree-lined boulevard near the Southbank and Docklands border.

The development concept is being offered for sale with the block, in what is expected to be a $6 million deal.

Earlier this week, developers paid $42 million for the Carlins Automotive Auctioneers site across the road, which was permitted by the former planning minister Matthew Guy to make way for four skyscrapers late last year.

The Fishermans Bend urban renewal project was formalised in mid-2012 when Mr Guy rezoned some 240 hectares of former industrial land to allow for high-density, high-rise buildings. A new train station was mooted for the area last year.

However, earlier this year, new planning minister Richard Wynne abandoned the train station and introduced height restrictions for parts of the precinct.

Montague is set to accommodate Fishermans Bend's tallest buildings of around 40 levels.

http://www.theage.com.au/business/capital-gain-monaco-consul-gets-275m-f...

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Qantas743's picture

So disappointing that from now on we know every new proposal at FB will not be taller than 40 levels.

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Melbman's picture

Some kind of control should be put in place, but I do feel that a more balanced approach is needed rather than height is the enemy.

The issue is that the councils want a bigger say and they certainly do have an aversion to height. If they do go down this path of giving them a bigger say, we will end up with nothing built, as developers will not have any real incentive to build anything.

I would love to see more variation in height though, but street level is a critical element that many do overlook, especially from what I seem to hear from the City of Melbourne. Lets try and hope that many will start to look at the ground up approach to planning.

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Melbourne Muse's picture

Can see a lot of 'land banking' in the short-term until any such limitation is removed.

Marvelous Mega-Melbourne

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Qantas743's picture

I hope so.

Montague is the logical expansion of the CBD/Southbank/Docklands. Limits are justified in Lorimer and Wirraway but in Montague is ridiculous.

It smacks of height limits for the sake of height limits and being seen to be bowing down to noisy councils.

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

There is absolutely no justification for height limits in the Lorimer precinct which is to the south of the Yarra and over 700m from the nearest existing dwellings.

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johnproctor's picture

agreed

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Qantas743's picture

Apologies, I meant to say Wirraway and Sandridge, not Lorimer.

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Mark Baljak's picture

Concerns remain over Fishermans Bend

While the Yarra’s Edge community can breathe a sigh of relief over the demise of the Fishermans Bend tram bridge, concerns remain over the potential heights of neighbouring buildings.
Planning Minister Richard Wynne last month announced a review of the Fishermans Bend plan and imposed interim height controls of 40-storeys in the Lorimer precinct, which neighbours Yarra’s Edge.
However, existing permit applications, including a proposal for a 74-storey tower at 85 Lorimer St, will be decided by the minister in accordance with pre-existing planning conditions for Fishermans Bend.
These planning conditions included recommended height limits as opposed to mandatory height limits.
Yarra’s Edge resident Phillip Spender was one of the key figures in the campaign against the tram bridge and said he was “greatly concerned” by the fact existing planning applications would be considered under the original planning conditions.
“We’re very disappointed that 85 Lorimer St and other developments in the pipeline will be considered under the old rules,” Mr Spender said. “We will fight this.”
If approved, the 74-storey residential building would soar above nearby buildings at Yarra’s Edge, which average 40 storeys.
However, Mr Spender said he was pleased the government was sticking by its promise to oppose the tram bridge.
“With respect to the tram bridge we’re encouraged that the government is standing by its election promise, however we would like to see this reflected in official documentation,” he said.
While no specific mention was made of the bridge when Mr Wynne announced the Fishermans Bend review, his spokesperson later confirmed the tram bridge concept was off the table.
While in opposition, the Labor government said it would not support the proposed tram bridge if elected.
The tram bridge has continued to appear in some Fishermans Bend imagery since the Labor government’s election in November last year but a spokesperson for Planning Minister Richard Wynne said its no bridge stance remained.

http://www.docklandsnews.com.au/editions/article/concerns-remain-over-fi...

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

I fail to see how a 70 storey tower would have any greater impact on Yarras Edge than a 40 storey tower. I guess some people in Yarras Edge are threatened by the changes that the provision of public transport and greater demographic spread will bring to what is currently a car based, dormitory suburb for the very wealthy.

I didn't realise that Labor promised to dump the tram bridge while not providing any alternative transport plan for Fishermans Bend. The Liberal plan for Fishermans Bend fell short in many areas but at least they had a plan.

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johnproctor's picture

^ they didn't have a plan the had some lines on a map.

agree re: 70 storey towers though no difference to Yarras Edge.

tbh I don't think the tram bridge was ever really that viable - it would have really struggled to fit between Y3 and ANZ on the north bank of the river anyway...

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Mark Baljak's picture

also given the nod today

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Mark Baljak's picture

http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/how-not-to-stuff-up-fishermans-bend-20...

How not to stuff up Fishermans Bend

No one wants another Docklands. So, we need to work out how not to mess up Fishermans Bend, one of the biggest urban redevelopment projects anywhere ever. Believe it not, this is how the place should look, at least in the first few years

and so on...

Great read but unless the state gov't starts buying sites here, there and everywhere at FB in order to meet some of those desired outcomes, economic reality will dictate a very different outcome

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Mark Baljak's picture

next project up for sales

Night Fall by BPM

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3000's picture

Nice

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Andrew's picture

BPM are probably my favourite developer for the smaller scale projects, they are doing amazing infill work in our suburbs with 2 and 3 bedroom apartments too (which many don't build), there are a number of their developments around me which are still being worked on or have just finished up, they all look great.

The shadowplay tower is just icing on their development cake.

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Mark Baljak's picture

Former Chrysler factory to be razed

The former Chrysler manufacturing plant in Fishermans Bend is set to be replaced with a low-rise, townhouse-based village after quietly being snapped by up Sydney investors.

The Art Deco factory, which following the Second World War became a local workshop for the UK-based Rootes Group, covers 2.2 hectares at 19 Salmon Street, Port Melbourne – a pocket rebranded Wirraway following the landmark Capital City 1 rezoning of the former industrial precinct by the former state government in mid-2012.

It is set to be demolished as part of plans lodged by the incoming owners who have reserved a right to purchase while the application is being reviewed.

Sources speculate the land sale deal could be worth upwards of $30 million. The block, which also fronts Williamstown Road, Plummer and Smith streets, is earmarked for some 153 dwellings of between three and four levels.

All of the townhouses will have three bedrooms, garages, courtyards and balconies.

The application is considered unusual for Fishermans Bend, with most applications being for towers of more than 20 levels and with hundreds of flats. Two skyscrapers of more than 50 levels were recently approved by Planning Minister Richard Wynne for sites in the Montague precinct of Fishermans Bend, closer to the CBD, Docklands and Southbank

http://www.theage.com.au/business/capital-gain-former-chrysler-factory-t...

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

The first development application that has been cut down to the arbitrary 40 level height limit has been submitted for 202-214 Normanby Road .

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Mark Baljak's picture

Fishermans Bend site sells for $18 million

The change of state government does not appear to have slowed demand for Fishermans Bend property with an investor paying nearly $18 million for a 3260-square-metre block that cannot be developed for at least 10 years.

The sale of 235-241 Normanby Road was concluded the day after an expressions of interest campaign closed last month.

Near the corner of Montague Street, the property is close to a 2640-square-metre block at 245-251 Normanby Road that sold to a developer in May for about $14 million.

Number 235-241 Normanby Road also piqued developer interest, being offered with a planning scheme that would have allowed 550 apartments in high-rise buildings.

Lemon Baxter's Nick Bade and Chris Curtain marketed the 4332-square-metre building which was undergoing a $3 million refurbishment when it was listed. The listed Navitas Group SAE's Institute pays a current rent of about $700,000, rising to just over $1 million once outgoings and an amortisation of the fitout is factored in. On that basis the investment sold on a low yield of 5.8 per cent.

Navitas Group has an option to stay 10 more years after the initial lease expiry in 2025.

http://www.theage.com.au/business/property/fishermans-bend-site-sells-fo...

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

Huge site, unfortunately limited to 40 levels because the towers might overshadow the freeway and some warehouses.

162 - 188 Turner Street Port Melbourne:

Use and development of the Land for the Purpose of Shops and Residential Dwellings more specifically the Proposal Comprises a Masterplan for the Development of the Land for the provision of Six Towers above Mixed Use Podiums and Associated Car Parking

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

Five more application in Fishermans bend:

31 - 37 Buckhurst Street
256 - 258 Normanby Road
264 - 270 Normanby Road
203 - 205 Normanby Road
207 - 217 Normanby Road

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Qantas743's picture

I wish developers had the sense to hold off on Fishermans Bend until these utterly ridiculous height limits are removed.

Just wasting prime sites on uniform 40-level buildings.

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