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Melbourne_Fragments's picture

no heritage overlay, Lord Mayor who refused to consider heritage if a proposal has been made as it "changes the rules', unfortunately not simple

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Bilby's picture

It's fascinating to watch the hand wringing over the Corkman affair, and compare it with the lack of concern over equally important heritage hotels like this one. It begs the question, what was all the fuss about with the Corkman demolition? To the all those who cried "Throw the book at them" or "Make them rebuild the heritage hotel brick by brick" - what were you actually concerned about? The heritage values of our city, or a breech of planning regulations and Occ. Health laws?
Remember this? http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/wall-collapses-at-north-melbourne-cons...

Compare the level of media coverage and community outrage between the wall collapse of a heritage pub in North Melbourne and the illegal demolition of the Corkman. It seems to me that the only difference was the heritage designation of the Corkman, since in both cases, there were breeches of planning and Occ. Health / public safety laws.

Ultimately, the public places too much faith in governments to "protect" our heritage assets. While people were right to be outraged about the loss of the Corkman,and the various breeches of law entailed in that demolition, they should be equally outraged at the proposed demolition of similarly historic hotels and commercial buildings around the city.The mere fact that the Corkman has been (correctly) assessed as a gold rush era hotel of heritage significance to Carlton, while other significant heritage pubs in the city itself have not been assessed with a heritage overlay applied, doesn't change the facts of the situation. We are about to lose one of a very few remaining buildings of its type left in the city, and the result will be a degradation of the heritage values of Melbourne.

In short, if you were one of those thousands of Melburnians who deplored the demolition of the Corkman as an act of heritage "vandalism" then you should deplore the demolition of 204-208 King Street on the same grounds. The fact that the council hasn't bothered to investigate the heritage significance of the place makes no difference to whether or not it actually is significant. It is. And its loss will be just as problematic for the future of Melbourne as a culturally rich urban centre.

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Grampians's picture

Please enlighten me, someone, anyone....how can it be still, that ANY structure of architectural, cultural or historical significance remains Unlisted?
ASLEEP at the effing wheel MCC!!!!!!

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Bilby's picture

Without Melbourne Heritage Action and the National Trust pushing hard for the Central City Heritage Review a few years back, there would still be zero protection for almost 100 very significant heritage buildings in the CBD. Council themselves hadn't done a CBD heritage review for some 30 years up to that point - and they're dragging their heels now about listing obvious precincts like the top end of Little Lon and Guildford Lane - both of which are being progressively destroyed piece by piece while they dither:

http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/building-and-development/urban-planning/...

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Adam Ford's picture

^^ well, that's incorrect. Anyone who has read Rohan Leppert's Twitter feed ought to know that he's been singlehandedly responsible for every heritage success anywhere in this city for the past decade.

On a more serious note, the graded properties from the original MCC 1984 Study were supposed to all get heritage overlays when the overlays were created in the nineties, but numerous properties missed out for whatever reason. Most were C and D graded properties, but the B-Graded former Robb's Annex was of course demolished by Grollo to much outcry last year.

For the new Rialto podium, which I walked past yesterday having to physically restrain my gag reflex

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Bilby's picture

Melbourne is full of irony these days. We have the Intercontinental Hotel nearby, trading off its heritage credentials and partnership with UNESCO in support of World Heritage Values, while metres away Grollo sets about demolishing the last vestige of the Robbs Building it destroyed back in 1981, which, had it survived, would now be regarded as one of the gems of Melbourne.

http://australia.etbtravelnews.global/131588/intercontinental-partners-w...

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Garmatt's picture

I agree - the new Rialto podium is just.......bizarre. Grollo's last 'up yours' to melbourne, maybe?

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TheAlmightyM's picture

The G-Dub closes on Friday 3rd March. Actually they already closed, but the operator was told they had to reopen an honor their lease to the end. So given the time between closure, rejection VCAT and demo, we can look forward to the building being covered in PORK with a side of NOST and LAMB for quite some time......

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Mark Baljak's picture

Naomi Milgrom appoints OMA's Rem Koolhaas, David Gianotten for fourth MPavilion

Naomi Milgrom has appointed high-profile architects Rem Koolhaas and David Gianotten of Netherlands-based architecture firm OMA to design the fourth MPavilion temporary cultural venue for Melbourne.

Mr Koolhaas, winner of the 2000 Pritzker Prize – architecture's equivalent of the Nobel – is known for large-scale projects such as the CCTV "Pants Building" in Beijing and the redevelopment of Europe's largest department store, Kaufhaus des Westens in Berlin. However, he gained fame as an urban thinker 40 years ago for describing the central role large cities would play with his book Delirious New York.

The design of the pavilion, which will replace the third version built by Indian architect Bijoy Jain, hasn't been released but it could be used to focus on the changing relationship between rural Australia and its urban centres, where population density is growing rapidly.

"What is very interesting in that is the juxtaposition of the rim of urban realm in Australia and the huge vast nature in the centre," said OMA managing director Mr Gianotten.

"It's almost never explored or part of the debate about cities and about their development. And that most liveable cities are in Australia, but nobody talks about the whole continent and what it actually means to be there, which is an interesting debate which maybe can happen also in the pavilion."

The structure, which will open to the public in October, will like its predecessors by Sean Godsell, Amanda Levete and Mr Jain host a series of talks, workshops, performances and installations.

"In pavilions you can test things you cannot do within buildings," Mr Koolhaas said.

Read more: http://www.afr.com/real-estate/naomi-milgrom-appoints-omas-rem-koolhaas-...

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Mark Baljak's picture

Deadlock threatens $650m Melbourne market project

An ambitious $650 million plan to refresh Melbourne's historic market is at risk of collapse with the state government and city hall at loggerheads over the project.

The stalemate centres on a 196-metre high residential tower that the city council has proposed on a large parcel of land its now controls next to Queen Victoria Market.

The 58-storey building is the linchpin in a series of related projects that will ultimately allow the council to deliver a wide-ranging refurbishment of the 130-year-old market.

Lord mayor Robert Doyle upped the ante over the weekend, warning that unless the stalemate with Planning Minister Richard Wynne is resolved promptly, the tower will not start in time.

For his part, Mr Wynne, a lifelong shopper at the market, has raised concerns about the treatment of the heritage sheds in the revamp and warned that towers too close to the market would overwhelm it.

"We're now batting up against deadlines that start to put the project at risk," Cr Doyle said.

Private player appointed

In the worst case scenario, "the redevelopment of Queen Vic market does not proceed", Cr Doyle said. "That's how serious it is."

The council has appointed private player PDG Corporation to develop a historic block, known as the Munro site, next to Queen Victoria Market.

Under its deal with council, PDG will develop the 308-unit apartment tower, along with a 300-room hotel.

Significantly for the council, the Munro development will include 56 affordable housing units, a 120-place childcare facility, and a maternal, child health and family services centre.

A community centre and kitchen, artist spaces and a gallery are also part of the Munro development along with a major carpark, which will free up other land around the market.

$90 million community benefit

The council has released the first images of its tower plan along with its estimation of the $90 million benefit the community facilities will bring

"It's a series of dominoes," Cr Doyle said. "Unless the first one falls, the others don't follow."

The council has so far been stymied in lodging its development application for the tower until new planning rules recommended for the market precinct are signed off by Mr Wynne.

"The City of Melbourne has invested heavily in this site and is naturally keen to get the best outcome, but there still needs to be a measured and considered approach to any proposed development," a spokesman for Mr Wynne said on the weekend.

Read more: http://www.afr.com/real-estate/deadlock-threatens-650m-melbourne-market-...

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Aussie Steve's picture

So it's okay for developers to break planning rules (built higher than the permit conditions) and build [insert inappropriate censored word] on the east side of Elizabeth St, but this development by the City of Melbourne isn't good enough? Oh PURLEASE!

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Riddlz's picture

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Melbourne_Fragments's picture

not too bad, though its unclear why they need to demolish heritage listed facades to replace them with identical height faux brick, and add faux-art deco towers to the corner building

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Mark Baljak's picture

nice competition design by K2LD for The Chinese Museum

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Den's picture

Oh ffs. C'mon, this project is exactly what QVM needs to be freshened up and become more of a joy and pleasant to look at. Why is the gov being such an idiot.

Also, do you have a better resolution for the Chinese Museum?

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Bilby's picture

Who are you asking for a "better resolution" for the Chinese Museum, Den?

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Nicholas Harrison's picture

I think he meant that he wants to see the pictures in a higher resolution.

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Mark Baljak's picture

244 Flinders St proposal for a new hotel - replaces Yooralla building

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Aussie Steve's picture

NOOOOO.....

There is no reason why this c.1930s/40s facade needs to be demolished, even though I like the new design, it can be built set-back, from the original facade.

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3000's picture

New design is nice but how on earth did they get a permit to develop on flinders this close to the station AND demolish a building there.

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Melbourne_Fragments's picture

no permit yet, it's at advertising stage in planning process. can't see CoM approving the demolition of facade, but of course the developer will have big name heritage consultant saying it's OK to demolish

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Mark Baljak's picture

Doyle ramps up the pressure..

Queen Victoria Market redevelopment: the best Melbourne has seen for 25 years

This month I unveiled council’s plans for Australia’s most socially, environmentally and financially sustainable mixed-use development on the council-owned Munro site as part the Queen Victoria Market precinct renewal.

I am very proud of those plans: it is the best proposed development our city has seen in 25 years.

The proposed development by PDG Corporation will deliver a $89.7 million public benefit to the City North precinct.

It ticks all the boxes: architectural excellence, quality apartment design, 56 affordable housing units, a 120 place childcare facility, a maternal, child health and family services centre, a community centre and kitchen, artists spaces and city room gallery, a hotel, five-star sustainability rating and generous setbacks.

It will also include car parking for market customers. It means the current car park at QVM, which is Melbourne’s oldest cemetery, can be returned to public open space. The Munro site is adjacent to QVM, which is about to undergo significant renewal as part of Council’s most ambitious project to date; the largest market renewal project in the world right now.

The City of Melbourne purchased the Munro site in 2015 to inoculate against inappropriate development right next to the market and to ensure a major supermarket or fast food chain didn’t move in there, in direct competition to QVM.

https://www.domain.com.au/news/queen-victoria-market-redevelopment-the-b...

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Melbourne_Fragments's picture

Nevermind that the developement wasn't going to include any social housing before Greens/Labor councillors voted on a motion to include it, Robert.

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Bilby's picture

Apparently, according to Vancouver urbanism expert, Brent Toderian, we have mucked up the way we do our tall buildings in Melbourne:

https://www.domain.com.au/news/urbanism-expert-brent-toderian-on-melbour...

But what would he know, right?

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zenith's picture

Cultural cringe. Still going strong.

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Development & Planning

Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 00:00
During July, Urban Melbourne reported on City of Melbourne's positive response to Salta Properties' bid to have a skyscraper approved at 63 Exhibition Street. Last week a permit for the mixed-use, Bates Smart-designed tower was granted by the Minister for Planning, concluding a lengthy three-year stint at planning for the application.

Policy, Culture & Opinion

Monday, September 25, 2017 - 00:00
No doubt about it, the emerging build-to-rent model has the property media in a tizz at the moment. What may in part become a solution to the housing and rental affordability dilemma has garnered immense media attention of late.

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Visual Melbourne

Friday, August 25, 2017 - 07:00
The former site of John Batman's home, Batman's Hill is entering the final stages of its redevelopment. Collins Square's final tower has begun its skyward ascent, as has Lendlease's Melbourne Quarter Commercial and Residential precinct already. Melbourne Quarter's first stage is at construction and involves a new 12-storey home for consultancy firm Arup along with a skypark.

Transport & Design

Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 12:00
Andréanne Doyon , RMIT University ; Joe Hurley , RMIT University ; Susie Moloney , RMIT University , and Trivess Moore , RMIT University Australia’s building and land-use policy settings fall well short of what’s needed to make meaningful progress toward creating sustainable cities. You will find environmental sustainability goals and objectives in government strategy documents.

Sustainability & Environment

Monday, September 4, 2017 - 12:00
The recent BDAV Building Design Awards once more showcased the talents and expertise of Victoria's building designers. 2017 was the 22nd year of the BDAV Design Awards, which aims to "profile excellence in building design, as well as profiling the importance of the building design profession to both the building industry and to the broader community." One project that ticked the boxes was Green Edge.