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PTV's Network Development Plan for Metropolitan Rail

Alastair Taylor's picture

Recently released this week

Full doco here:

Youtube presentation summarising everything:

And the pics most relevant / convey the most meaning.

Key Network Constraints

Forecast for patronage

As-is Transfers breakdown

Walking distance to PT Modes:

Stage 1 - 2016 - Line Configuration on opening of RRL

Projects required to make Stage 1 possible

Stage 2 - within 10 years - Line Configuration on opening of Melbourne Metro

Projects required to make Stage 2 possible

Stage 3 - within 15 years - Line configuration

Projects required to make Stage 3 possible

Stage 4 - within 20 years - Line configuration (ultimate goal of the plan)

Projects required to make Stage 4 possible

Summary of service improvements on trunk and Branch sections across all 4 stages

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Vincent's picture

A summary for those who don't have the time to go over the documents:

Stage 1 - 2012-2016
Sunbury electrification
South Morang extension
Regional Rail Link
Hurstbridge Line signalling upgrades
Updated timetables

Stage 2 - within 10 years
Melbourne Metro rail tunnel
Dandenong corridor upgrades and grade separations
High capacity trains
High capacity signalling
Clifton Hill group upgrade
Melton duplication

Stage 3 - within 15 years
High capacity signalling (continued)
Dandenong corridor upgrades and grade separations (continued)
Melbourne Airport line
Rowville line
Doncaster line
Clifton Hill - Southern Cross tunnel (Clifton Hill Loop Line)
Frankston - Baxter electrification
Melton electrification
Cranbourne duplication
Somerton - Upfield link

Stage 4 - within 20 years
Fisherman's Bend line
City Loop reconfiguration
Geelong electrification
Wallan electrification
Burnley-Camberwell quadruplication
Altona Junction-Seaholme duplication
Mooroolbark-Lilydale duplication
Werribee-Wyndham Vale extension
South Morang-Mernda extension

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Alastair Taylor's picture

Updated first post with most relevant images from the report

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Peter Maltezos's picture

Let's hope that we get stations in Kew, East Kew and Balwyn with the Doncaster extension in stage 3.


The former Kew Station ~ 1910s

Yes, Kew once had a Station on Denmark Street, it was closed in 1957, demolished and replaced with Vicroads’ main office.


I collect, therefore I am.

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Alastair Taylor's picture

heh, I doubt it'll get re-opened, the biggest candidate for the old outer circle line to be re-opened will be the Alamein - Huntingdale section (albeit no doubt it'd be via a tunnel under Chadstone to Oakleigh instead).

Not in these plans, but plans can change.

For instance the alteration to the plans -could- be between STages 2 and 3:

- build the 4th platform at Camberwell earlier, remove Willison station and grade sep Riversdale, build the Alamein - Oakleigh connection and Rowville all at once which the trains just shuttling between Rowville and Camberwell - the Dandenong corridor upgrades will come online at the same time and the Rowville line concept can be turned on its head. FRom being just a commuter line to an actual cross-town line of use to vastly more people.


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Alastair Taylor's picture

Even though it's been slated for construction after Melbourne Metro - I'm wondering where the portal for the new cross-city line linking South Morang line to Fishermans Bend (and potentially beyond) will be. Would the most sensible solution be to take up (temporarily) some of the road space of Hoddle Street next to Clifton Hill station to build underground platforms - so as much of the existing line's alignment can be used?

What about the tight turn between Rushall and Merri Stations? Is Rushall Station worth keeping?

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Melbman's picture

Although all this planning looks great, I still can't see where all the $$ will come from to make much of this come to fruition.

The 2 most pressing PT projects really are to deliver the Metro Rail Tunnel and MEL airport line.

AVV can even be served by a AirTrain Connection to Lara station, developing that station instead of making a new stand alone station on that line. That would lead to futher benefits for Lara as it is a identified growth area in the Geelong development plan. I think most stakeholders have already given up on the idea of a railway line going into the airport itself.

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Martin Mankowski's picture

According to PTV's data, Rushall has 576 weekday boardings a day, ranking it 193. Its also close to 2 tram lines, and not all that far away from Westgarth station. So I wouldn't say its all that essential.

I think your Hoddle St plan is probably the way to go. Whats the alternative - start the tunnel at Merri and eliminate the bend? Surely you'd still want it to run through Clifton Hill, as it represents the most options for connectivity. I'd personally connect Doncaster to here as well, rather than Victoria Park and Collingwood.

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Alastair Taylor's picture
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Martin Mankowski's picture

Great article. Agree with almost all if it.

I saw ian Dobbs speak at a function last year and I was really impressed, he came across as really astute. Unfortunately his vision far outstrips that of the government he works for. He must be pulling his hair out every time he hears the East Worst tunnel mentioned!

Whilst he is largely ignored now, hopefully the next government is brave enough to take a fiscal punt on his PT plan.

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Chris Peska's picture

In my opinion as a state and for our future we need to borrow some money in order to pay for infrastructure such as the Melbourne Metro to cater for the future needs of the city. If we don't do it now, we will be paying for this for many years to come and could have severe consequences to our future sustainable growth. One of the main reasons that the government are so scared to borrow is due to maintaining our AAA credit rating... if we borrow a large amount, this will surely affect it and the credit rating is more important to the government than making sure that we are able to get around efficiently...

Observe. Design. Build. Live.

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Peter Maltezos's picture

I say we should be the first to start ignoring the big three private rating agencies and hope that other governments do the same.

Borrowing now at record low interest rates for infrastructure and defeating inflation is logical.

Sovereign states listening to discredited private agencies is illogical!


One of the main reasons to ignore these agencies:

The three credit rating agencies were key enablers of the financial meltdown (GFC). The mortgage-related securities at the heart of the crisis could not have been marketed and sold without their seal of approval. Investors relied on them, often blindly. In some cases, they were obligated to use them, or regulatory capital standards were hinged on them. This crisis could not have happened without the rating agencies.

I collect, therefore I am.

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Mark Baljak's picture

Derailed station plan exposed

September 19, 2013 Adam Carey

A new railway station at Southland shopping centre is likely to have few of the amenities voters were promised at the last state election, because the Coalition grossly underestimated the project's cost and is now looking to build it as cheaply as possible.
The planned station would be built without the promised waiting room, lifts, bike cage, two-bay bus interchange and drop-off and pick-up zone, according to state government documents. It would also have no public toilets, and just 10 per cent of the platform area would have shelter, although it would have facilities for protective services officers.
Lengthy negotiations with Southland owner Westfield, which the Napthine government hopes will help pay for the station, will delay its opening until at least 2016-17, some six years after the Coalition made its promise. When it does open, it will become the fourth-busiest station on the Frankston line, attracting 4400 passengers a day, modelling by transport consultancy Sinclair Knight Merz forecasts.

Read more:

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Peter Maltezos's picture

Coalition grossly underestimated the project's cost and is now looking to build it as cheaply as possible.

FFS, it's a one off cost that will leave a great legacy for generations to come! angry

Borrowing money has never been cheaper, just build this station properly!

I collect, therefore I am.

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Mark Baljak's picture

Councillor calls for public transport to run through night
October 4, 2013

Melbourne's public transport would operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week under a proposal a Melbourne city councillor hopes the state government will adopt.
Cr Richard Foster has called on lord mayor Robert Doyle and transport portfolio chairwoman Cathy Oke to lobby Public Transport Minister Terry Mulder for all-night public transport in the city, arguing it would reduce crime and benefit the economy.
''We're trying to create a 24-hour international city and it's pretty hard to do that if you're not offering 24-hour public transport as well,'' Cr Foster said.
''It's certainly practical, it's what the public has been calling for for some time [and] if we seriously want to offer an international city that is safe and vibrant, you've got to have an international-standard public transport service.''
But the Napthine government was quick to hose down the proposal, arguing it would prevent maintenance work that is needed to run peak-hour services efficiently.

Read more:

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Martin Mankowski's picture

Nice idea in theory but little chance of getting up. Aside from the already mentioned maintenance dilemma, it would cost a pretty penny to employ all the extra drivers needed and pay them the necessary penalty rates to drive through the night. And as they'd be driving largely empty trains, its a cost where mostly none of it would be recouped.

London, Hong Kong, Shanghai all don't have 24 hour trains, and they are much larger and denser cities than Melbourne, and arguably have a larger spread of night life. I'd say we are better off expanding the Night Bus.

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gobillino's picture

agree. not sure why the prospect of 7 day night rider operation wasn't discussed in the article. seems the logical option to me. options for a select number of 24hr tram routes (at least on weekends) would be a nice start too (eg 96, 112, 86, 19, or parts thereof)

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Melbman's picture

I agree that the idea of 24/7 Train services is great but the reality just has too many challenges.

I can see some extended tram services being a good idea though on Fri-Sun. This would be a great start.

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Alastair Taylor's picture
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Alastair Taylor's picture
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Martin Mankowski's picture

Smacks of a government getting really desperate in an election year. To go back to the drawing board now would put the project back another 5-10 years - essentially making it someone else's problem, exactly what they want. Infuriating.

I don't understand why they think they have to build it cut and cover. To go underneath the loop wouldnt be that deep I would have thought, given that Melbourne Central Station was built cut and cover itself (Flagstaff and Parliament are much deeper). And given Flinders St Station is right on the river, its gonna have to go deep under that anyway. There are underground stations much deeper than that around the world. When living in the UK, my work tube station (Kennington) required an elevator to access as it was too deep for Escalators!

Just another excuse not to upgrade public transport.

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Mark Baljak's picture

Shifting Melbourne Metro rail tunnel west a 'catastrophe': Doyle

The proposed Melbourne Metro rail tunnel will still deliver passengers into the city centre, despite the Napthine government's recent decision to scrap plans to tunnel beneath Swanston Street.
It was revealed this week that the government is considering realigning the $9-11 billion rail tunnel so that it runs through Fishermans Bend south-west of the CBD, radically rewriting the script for Victoria's biggest public transport project.
Melbourne's lord mayor Robert Doyle said shifting Melbourne Metro west would be a "100-year catastrophe for the city" and urged the state government to recommit to the route that was originally proposed.
"The Berlin Wall was a 30-year mistake but not building Metro One in the original way it was designed would be a 100-year catastrophe for our city," Cr Doyle told Jon Faine on 774 ABC on Wednesday.
"We need that underground station [in Parkville] as part of Metro One right in the heart of where our new cancer centre will be, our research precinct, the University of Melbourne, the Royal Melbourne Hospital, the Royal Women's Hospital, it's just crucial that we service that with a large underground rail station," he said.

Read more:

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Peter Maltezos's picture

Napthine doesn't understand short term pain for long term gain! enlightened

I collect, therefore I am.

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Alastair Taylor's picture

Purely speculating here....

Southern Cross the new focal point (quite a meritous idea)

Shorter Melb Metro 1 tunnel = save on tunneling costs, could potential reconfigure westernmost current city loop ramps just south of North Melbourne (and build another alongside it) so the existing track is used through North Melbourne and tunnelled southward to Southern Cross, under the Yarra - with a station at City Road/Kings Way / Queensbridge Street  (use the dead space directly underneath King's Way to dig the station pit), then generally along King's Way to Domain and follow the same plan as current (soon to be obsolete?) South Yarra end.

- notable addition new platforms at South Yarra, yeah expensive/same deal as Flinders Street being expensive but come on, it's a major interchange station already - reallocate the funds to stations after saving on Tunnelling.

The CLifton Hill - Newport line on map is form the PTV plan, just with the line continuing all the way to Newport.

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Mark Baljak's picture

Metro rail tunnel plan will include Melbourne airport link

February 27, 2014

The long-demanded rail link to Melbourne airport will be included in an expanded Metro rail tunnel plan that Premier Denis Napthine has promised will begin this decade.

Speaking at a Property Council lunch in Melbourne on Wednesday, Dr Napthine said: ''Let me absolutely assure you, our government is committed to a rail capacity project, to enhance rail capacity through the centre of Melbourne, to boost rail capacity on the Dandenong line and the Gippsland line. We need it, it is essential.

''We are committed by the end of this decade to be building a rail capacity project and include in that a link to the airport.

''We will deliver that because it is absolutely essential, so don't let anybody have a misunderstanding about our commitment to that as a key project.''

It is believed the much-discussed airport link plan will be ramped up as part of the ''realigned'' Metro rail project, following internal research showing the idea remains highly popular.

Transport Minister Terry Mulder has confirmed the preferred route will run from the airport boundary via new tracks through a reserved land and freight corridor, before using the existing rail tracks from Sunbury to connect with the Metro tunnel.

Mr Mulder has said it would allow people to use the planned Dandenong-Sunshine rail corridor to travel to the airport.

His spokeswoman confirmed that the airport route, known as the Albion East option, remains the preferred alignment for the rail link, although the final alignment of the Metro project could result in its connection into the city changing. But problems could arise because the existing freight line relies on diesel trains, without electrification.

It is believed Melbourne Airport chief executive Chris Woodruff expressed concern about the possibility of diesel trains being used at the airport at a meeting with Department of Premier and Cabinet secretary Andrew Tongue.

Asked about the possibility of diesel trains servicing the route, Melbourne Airport spokeswoman Anna Gillett said the priority was for a rail link that ''best serves the needs of Victorians and visitors'', saying it was needed ''sooner rather than later''.

''By 2033 we expect more than 60 million passengers a year and we need all forms of ground transport - taxis, private vehicles, buses, Skybus, and a train - to work well for people to get to and from their flights."

The Premier also told the Property Council lunch that extending the planned east-west tollway to the Port of Melbourne and across to the Western Ring Road was ''on the agenda''.

The Victorian division of the Property Council also released its policy agenda at the lunch.

The wish list included a call to privatise government assets including Victoria's share of the Snowy Mountain Hydro Scheme, water authorities and the Port of Melbourne to help fund new infrastructure. The developer lobby group described the asset sales or long-term leases as an ''asset recycling agenda'', and said it could extend to ''vacated school and other education sites … public buildings in prime locations and tracts of vacant land in and around Melbourne and its rail network''.

Read more:

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Martin Mankowski's picture

Diesel? How the hell are they gonna run a diesel train through a tunnel? It would have to terminate at Southern Cross, making its link to the Metro project mute. Even if they do build an electric train, making it an airport-Dandenong project, it would most likely be planned as a Stage 1/Stage 2 option, built years apart, making the link between these projects tenuous at best.

Napthine's dilly daddling on this project is starting to get infuriating. Just build it as planned FFS!!!

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