Transforming Australian Cities - a must read

Update: 30/8/13.  Kevin Rudd has announced if the ALP are re-elected on September 7th, they will establish a Minister for Cities.  We welcome Federal Leadership in cities and hope everyone who views the following lecture walks away with the same impression we did: increasing density in appropriate areas - distributed thoughtout entire metros - increases localised economic opportunity away from the central cores of Australia's cities.  

If we're to have a debate the future of our cities, we believe strategies like Transforming Australian Cities should be at the forefront of outlining alternatives to never-ending outer suburban growth and a way to get a better return out of each and every Australian city's existing infrastructure for future productive growth.

Original Text 11/03/2013:

The City of Melbourne's Director of Design, Rob Adams, authored a report in 2009, which was then revised in 2010, on how it is possible to grow Melbourne by another 2.5-3.5 million people by utilising a mere 10% of the existing urban area - without sprawling further and further beyond the Urban Growth boundary.

If you have a spare hour, a must for anyone wishing to understand the Transforming Australian Cities strategy should watch the following lecture Rob gave to the Simon Fraser University in Canada where he paints the historical context and goes through the 11 steps of elimination to calculate the area available for redevelopment in future.

 

The supporting documentation is also available on CoM's website. 

 

 

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Development & Planning

Monday, August 21, 2017 - 00:00
Considering the sheer volume of apartment projects Melbourne has absorbed over recent years, the rate of failed projects is comparatively miniscule. Very few apartment projects that launched their respective sales campaigns over the last five years failed to progress to construction.

Policy, Culture & Opinion

Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 12:00
Carolyn Whitzman , University of Melbourne Liveability is an increasingly important goal of Australian planning policy. And creating cities where residents can get to most of the services they need within 20 to 30 minutes has been proposed, at both federal and state level, as a key liveability-related mechanism.

Visual Melbourne

Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 12:00
Part Three follows on from the Part One: Yarra's Edge and Part Two: Victoria Harbour. The focus of today's piece will be NewQuay and Harbour Town, the northern most precincts within Docklands. NewQuay NewQuay was the first precinct to open way back in 2003 and has probably evolved the most.

Transport & Design

Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 07:15
CBRE in recent weeks has begun marketing a development site at 118 City Road in Southbank which has been branded as 'Flagship'. The 6,191sqm site is currently home to a BMW dealership and showroom, and has significant potential to add to what is set to become on of the densest city blocks in Melbourne, boasting towers of 200m through to over 300m.

Sustainability & Environment

Monday, August 21, 2017 - 12:00
The notion of Melbourne becoming a 20-minute City has been explored heavily in recent times. Seeking to provide Melburnians with the ability to 'live locally', the 20-minute City, in essence, strives to provide people with the ability to meet most of their everyday needs within a 20-minute walk, cycle or local public transport trip of their home.