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Policy

Source, Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/39551170@N02/8215959691

Will the Commission of Audit lead to another 'new federalism'?

The Commission of Audit has not flinched from making a tranche of bold recommendations to the Abbott government, but nothing in its report trumps the call for the Commonwealth to withdraw from areas that were once essentially state responsibilities, including education and health. This would be nothing less than a major recalibration of Australia’s federal system, reversing decades of steady centralisation.

Chris Hayton on the height debate

Height is perhaps the most contentious of all issues when discussing new building proposals. Maybe because it is readily quantifiable relative to the surroundings, or because fear of height has become a default response to any new development, it is often debated as a singular issue. Many ignore the other factors that contribute to the appropriateness of building’s design. Such simplistic quarantining of the height debate is often to the...

Renting for life? Housing shift requires rethink of renters' rights

Australia is the world capital for property speculation. Australians play property like Monopoly: buying, selling, demolishing, rebuilding, extending, renovating, always with the promise of appreciation on resale. The contribution to GDP of real estate transactions alone is the highest in the world, and three times higher than that in the US.

Flight paths and tall buildings in Melbourne explained

Earlier this year issues regarding the impact that flights paths around Melbourne's airports and development of tall buildings in central Melbourne were raised following the then approval of Australia 108 tower which at 388 metres high would have been the tallest building in Melbourne and the Southern Hemisphere. Since this issue was initially raised there has been a lot of confusion and misunderstanding in relation to how airspace restrictions...

Conversations with Matthew Guy, Episode II - In the Zone

Following on from Alastair's article on Monday , Urban Melbourne continues its coverage of the Plan Melbourne Strategy by today taking a look at the Reformed Zones, particularly the new Residential Zones - setting the scene for what is effectively Part 2 of our interview with Planning Minister Matthew Guy. July 1st 2013 saw the introduction of five new zones across the state - Residential Growth Zone, General Residential Zone, Neighbourhood...

Matthew Guy on the MPA, Transport advice and PANS-OPS

As the first in a series of articles revolving around an interview held with State Planning Minister Matthew Guy in the wake of the Plan Melbourne strategy release, today's article centres around the Metropolitan Planning Authority (MPA) which was similarly launched last week; as a successor to the Growth Areas Authority . Whilst still in its infancy, the Metropolitan Planning Authority's website carries the following description: The MPA has...

EcoDenCity for Sydney, following in the footsteps of Vancouver

Read Editor Alastair Taylor's blog post on the parallels that can be drawn on the EcoDenCity initiative in Sydney and the Planning Zone reforms currently underway in Victoria here . A new initiative by Urban Taskforce Australia seeks to address the issues in housing Sydney's diverse and growing communities. Named EcoDenCity, it echoes many aspects of the approach Vancouver took in the last decade to address its growth. In June 2006, the then...

We're Goin' Up Around The Bend

"Catch a ride to the end of the highway. And we'll meet by the big red tree. There's a place up ahead and I'm goin'. Come along, come along with me" These lyrics are synonymous with US rock band Creedence Clearwater Revival's Up Around the Bend but would also seem equally at home in the Napthine Government's Draft vision for Fishermans Bend. Released on Monday the draft signals the beginning of the community consultation process (which runs...

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Development & Planning

Monday, August 21, 2017 - 00:00
Considering the sheer volume of apartment projects Melbourne has absorbed over recent years, the rate of failed projects is comparatively miniscule. Very few apartment projects that launched their respective sales campaigns over the last five years failed to progress to construction.

Policy, Culture & Opinion

Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 12:00
Carolyn Whitzman , University of Melbourne Liveability is an increasingly important goal of Australian planning policy. And creating cities where residents can get to most of the services they need within 20 to 30 minutes has been proposed, at both federal and state level, as a key liveability-related mechanism.

Visual Melbourne

Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 12:00
Part Three follows on from the Part One: Yarra's Edge and Part Two: Victoria Harbour. The focus of today's piece will be NewQuay and Harbour Town, the northern most precincts within Docklands. NewQuay NewQuay was the first precinct to open way back in 2003 and has probably evolved the most.

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Transport & Design

Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 07:15
CBRE in recent weeks has begun marketing a development site at 118 City Road in Southbank which has been branded as 'Flagship'. The 6,191sqm site is currently home to a BMW dealership and showroom, and has significant potential to add to what is set to become on of the densest city blocks in Melbourne, boasting towers of 200m through to over 300m.

Sustainability & Environment

Monday, August 21, 2017 - 12:00
The notion of Melbourne becoming a 20-minute City has been explored heavily in recent times. Seeking to provide Melburnians with the ability to 'live locally', the 20-minute City, in essence, strives to provide people with the ability to meet most of their everyday needs within a 20-minute walk, cycle or local public transport trip of their home.