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Victoria Walks launches crowdsourcing campaign: opinions on walking around Melbourne

Victoria Walks, a walking promotion charity supported by VicHeath, is leading a crowdsourcing initiative that is supported by the State Government and 14 councils. The campaign aims to collect and analyse opinions on walking right across the Melbourne metropolitan area.

The authorities are asking people to indicate their walking safety concerns through an interactive online map on CrowdSpot's platform.

"This is the first time the CrowdSpot platform has been used to gather pedestrian perceptions right across a major city" said Anthony Aisenberg, Director of CrowdSpot.

Melburnians can "indicate concerns like a lack of pedestrian crossings, poor street lighting, high traffic speed or footpath problems" reads a media release from Victoria Walks.

Dr Ben Rossiter, the Executive Officer of Victoria Walks, said "our understanding of road safety issues is usually limited to official crash statistics, which only tell part of the story".  

"Crash statistics provide data on serious injury crashes, but they don't tell us about all crashes, what people are worried about and where they do or don't feel safe walking".

In the last 10 years, 444 pedestrians lost their lives on Victorian roads and Dr Rossiter says that business as usual is not an option anymore.

"Road agencies won't be able to fix every problem and action will take time. But the feedback from the community will help them decide what to do and where".

To get involved, see the 'WalkSpot' platform: https://www.walkspot.org.au/

 

 

3 comments

George D's picture

Good luck to VicHealth. VicRoads will ignore it, as they ignore other data.

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johnproctor's picture

VicRoads is a lot more responsive than they used to be to these issues particularly in central Melbourne.

Also I expect many of the spots that will be identified will actually be on Council managed roads. Eg. the only roads in the Hoddle grid which are VicRoads managed are King Street and Spencer Street.

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George D's picture

Are you kidding mate?

There's an intersection that has had TWO pedestrian deaths in seven years, and both are directly attributable to poor design - slip lanes are very well known in road safety as a cause of severe injury and death and are known to be unsafe. The second one had the tragic irony of being beneath a TAC billboard stating that "Nobody deserves to die on our roads".

Despite this, it remains unfixed, waiting to kill the next poor person. So no, I don't think they take information about safety seriously at all.

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