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Blue Earth Group

Fishermans Bend's first project breaks ground

Amidst the ongoing political kick-to-kick over the handling of Fishermans Bend, a new era has begun as the Urban Renewal Area's first project has officially commenced construction. Developer Blue Earth Group's Gravity Tower now sees head contractor Hamilton Marino in charge of the project which fronts Montague Street and Gladstone Street. Geotechnical Engineering has been engaged as a specialist subcontractor, going about delivering foundation...

Gravity Tower poised to become Fishermans Bend's first build

Could this be Fishermans Bend's first tower to reach construction? A planning application first highlighted on Urban Melbourne during August 2013 looks likely to take the title of Fishermans Bend's first project to become reality. 91 Montague Street , now better known as Gravity Tower @ 89 Gladstone Street is the latest project to be delivered by assiduous Melbourne-based developer Blue Earth Group. In line with Blue Earth Group's business plan...

Back from the dead

When was the last time a sizable apartment project began construction, only to fall over and remain dormant? It certainly doesn't happen that often, particularly now given current market conditions and a buying/sales frenzy over any viable piece of land throughout inner Melbourne. I'm sure there have been plenty before, but for the life of me I can't recall any bar one: 392 St Georges Road, Fitzroy North. Taken at the turn of 2012, the lead...
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Development & Planning

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 - 07:00
Hawthorn's Queens Avenue is emerging as an apartment hot spot of sorts, as developers realise the worth of converting the light industrial and commercial strip into a higher density apartment enclave. Running parallel to Burwood Road, Queens Avenue now has six apartment developments in progress.

Policy, Culture & Opinion

Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 12:00
Carolyn Whitzman , University of Melbourne Liveability is an increasingly important goal of Australian planning policy. And creating cities where residents can get to most of the services they need within 20 to 30 minutes has been proposed, at both federal and state level, as a key liveability-related mechanism.

Visual Melbourne

Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 12:00
Part Three follows on from the Part One: Yarra's Edge and Part Two: Victoria Harbour. The focus of today's piece will be NewQuay and Harbour Town, the northern most precincts within Docklands. NewQuay NewQuay was the first precinct to open way back in 2003 and has probably evolved the most.

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Transport & Design

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 - 12:00
The Victorian Government has announced the winning bidders in the tender to power Melbourne's tram network by renewable energy. At the same time, the Victorian Government has announced plans to legislate the Victorian Renewable Energy Target (VRET) ensuring that by 2020, 25% of Victoria's energy will come from renewable sources and the target rises to 40% by 2025.

Sustainability & Environment

Monday, August 21, 2017 - 12:00
The notion of Melbourne becoming a 20-minute City has been explored heavily in recent times. Seeking to provide Melburnians with the ability to 'live locally', the 20-minute City, in essence, strives to provide people with the ability to meet most of their everyday needs within a 20-minute walk, cycle or local public transport trip of their home.