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Flinders Street Station

Photograph taken at end of a Saturday working day, 12:20 pm in 1927.

Flinders Street Station: Melbourne's most popular iconic landmark

Flinders Street Station occupies the equivalent of two city blocks, occupying the site bordered by Flinders Street to the north and the Yarra River to the south. The site extends from Swanston Street on its eastern ground level border all the way to Queen Street in the west. The first train station on the current Flinders Street Station site was called Melbourne Terminus. The original station was comprised of a collection of weatherboard sheds...

Was the Flinders Street Station competition value for money?

Recently the Melbourne media has reported that the winning design for the Flinders Street Station Design Ideas Competition by Hassell and Herzog & De Meuron would cost a whopping $2 billion to build. Naturally this has drawn many to question the wisdom in undertaking the design competition in the first place. After all if we cannot afford to build it, what is the point? Firstly some background. Launched in November 2011, the competition with...

Public Transport + Architecture = Seagull on a hot chip; thoughts on Flinders Street Station competition entries

Yesterday the Premier revealed the six short-listed designs in the $1million competition for Flinders Street Station's future. Despite the predictable yarn from the public transport advocates who have an inability to think beyond their next gunzelesque rant (refer to tweet) the amount of people engaging with the people's choice competition has been outstanding. Of course, first step towards.making the trains run on time is ensuring the station...
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Development & Planning

Monday, August 21, 2017 - 00:00
Considering the sheer volume of apartment projects Melbourne has absorbed over recent years, the rate of failed projects is comparatively miniscule. Very few apartment projects that launched their respective sales campaigns over the last five years failed to progress to construction.

Policy, Culture & Opinion

Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 12:00
Carolyn Whitzman , University of Melbourne Liveability is an increasingly important goal of Australian planning policy. And creating cities where residents can get to most of the services they need within 20 to 30 minutes has been proposed, at both federal and state level, as a key liveability-related mechanism.

Visual Melbourne

Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 12:00
Part Three follows on from the Part One: Yarra's Edge and Part Two: Victoria Harbour. The focus of today's piece will be NewQuay and Harbour Town, the northern most precincts within Docklands. NewQuay NewQuay was the first precinct to open way back in 2003 and has probably evolved the most.

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Transport & Design

Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 07:15
CBRE in recent weeks has begun marketing a development site at 118 City Road in Southbank which has been branded as 'Flagship'. The 6,191sqm site is currently home to a BMW dealership and showroom, and has significant potential to add to what is set to become on of the densest city blocks in Melbourne, boasting towers of 200m through to over 300m.

Sustainability & Environment

Monday, August 21, 2017 - 12:00
The notion of Melbourne becoming a 20-minute City has been explored heavily in recent times. Seeking to provide Melburnians with the ability to 'live locally', the 20-minute City, in essence, strives to provide people with the ability to meet most of their everyday needs within a 20-minute walk, cycle or local public transport trip of their home.