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NGV Pavilion

NGV Pavilion 2016: Laurence Dragomir and Isaac Mortimer

As was previously mentioned in an earlier article , as part of Grimshaw's entry into the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) Pavilion competition, the office undertook an internal design competition. Today's piece looks at a scheme I developed with my good friend and colleague, Isaac Mortimer. The design is based around the principle of a 450mm x 450mm module repeated to form an enclosure that defines a series of smaller and larger formal and...
Hero Shot.

NGV Pavilion 2016 entry: John Kachami

Following on from last week's piece on Grimshaw's NGV pavilion design , there has been some interest in highlighting other schemes. I was due to present my scheme this week, but will leave that for next week. In its place is a scheme dubbed "Unfamiliar Terrain", prepared by a fellow RMIT School of Architecture alumni, John Kachami. Unfamiliar Terrain seeks to explore the interplay between rational construction and artistic ambition. A single 1...
Grimshaw NGV Pavilion 2016 hero shot. Image courtesy of Grimshaw

Grimshaw's NGV Pavilion 2016 entry

The National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) recently announced the shortlist of architects for its 2016 pavilion in the Grollo-Equiset Gardens within the grounds of the NGV. Five practices will now proceed to stage two of the competition. They are: [email protected] March Studio Nervegna Reed Architecture Other Architects/Otherothers Thomas Winwood Architecture Grimshaw Archtects ' Melbourne office was one of 93 entrants who submitted a design for the...
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Development & Planning

Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 12:00
Architecture practice HASSELL is heading design efforts for a new office development with an end value of $163 million that will see job search firm SEEK take root within Cremorne. The atypically shaped campus-style building was lodged with City of Yarra earlier this month, nominating a large land parcel at 60-88 Cremorne Street as SEEK's new headquarters.

Policy, Culture & Opinion

Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 12:00
Carolyn Whitzman , University of Melbourne Liveability is an increasingly important goal of Australian planning policy. And creating cities where residents can get to most of the services they need within 20 to 30 minutes has been proposed, at both federal and state level, as a key liveability-related mechanism.

Visual Melbourne

Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 12:00
Part Three follows on from the Part One: Yarra's Edge and Part Two: Victoria Harbour. The focus of today's piece will be NewQuay and Harbour Town, the northern most precincts within Docklands. NewQuay NewQuay was the first precinct to open way back in 2003 and has probably evolved the most.

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Transport & Design

Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 00:00
Comment It was looking flakey already but now with the announcement over the weekend that the on-again, off-again rail port shuttles are back on the agenda, the West Gate Tunnel project has gone beyond barely scraping through the sniff test to stinking to high heaven.

Sustainability & Environment

Monday, August 21, 2017 - 12:00
The notion of Melbourne becoming a 20-minute City has been explored heavily in recent times. Seeking to provide Melburnians with the ability to 'live locally', the 20-minute City, in essence, strives to provide people with the ability to meet most of their everyday needs within a 20-minute walk, cycle or local public transport trip of their home.