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NIMBY

Fishermans Bend: will apartment towers kill it?

Apologies to Fry, but we just couldn't resist taking a bite at this topic. If you didn't read The Age on Saturday (5/10/13), you should peruse this piece titled 'Apartment towers are killing the world's most livable city.' Call it part sensationalism, part truth, part fluff... but mostly ridiculous! Upon reading the piece, imagine now the words "apartment towers" in the headline were actually sprawl-belt development or urban fringe development...

High-rises can work with the public realm

Focusing on the height of a new development has become somewhat of a sport in Melbourne of late. Yesterday was no exception with the Associate Editor of The Age Shane Green writing a column titled High-rise utopia or another pie-in-the-sky pipe dream? In it, Green states "The real risk he [Planning Minister Matthew Guy] faces is that this [Fishermans Bend] will be another Docklands - our last big urban renewal idea that was so poorly executed...

Melbourne's future: a sip of Tsim Sha Tsui and a gulp of Brooklyn

Daniel Ziffer, writing a comment piece in The Age on June 4th 2013 argued Melbourne was not like New York where “the diverse mix of housing in Manhattan — tenements, walk-ups, low-rise apartment buildings — is supported by the services that you get when a city develops over decades, not years”. Unfortunately to date, the majority of the Melburnians have only been drip fed snippets from the mainstream media regarding apartment living and it has...

Caroline Springs in the sky?

The reaction from some Melburnians with regards to the marketing campaign by Hong Kong-based developer Far East Consortium, comparing its apartment development on the corner of Spencer and Lonsdale Streets to New York is genuinely one of amusement. There is hardly the need for any in depth research to convince most Melburnians the comparison is rather silly. However the comment piece ‘Developers' tall tales are all pie in the sky’ ​by ABC...

Mitcham Towers - Lost in evolution

On occasion I venture into the Eastern suburbs and more often than not catch a glimpse of Mitcham Village Apartments, successor to the failed Bates Smart designed 17-storey Mitcham Towers proposal (seen below) circa 2003. At the time Tony Hogg, head of Mitcham Residents Association described the proposal as "A complete eyesore." Well a penny for Mr Hogg's current thoughts as what the local community ended up with is a visually destitute outcome...

Development & Planning

Friday, December 2, 2016 - 06:00
Almost three years to the day of Urban Melbourne covering Eq. Tower's planning application , ICD Property's 62-storey tower at 127-141 A'Beckett Street has held its topping out ceremony. The event held onsite yesterday coincided with the first round of residents settling on apartments within the Elenberg Fraser designed scraper.

Policy, Culture & Opinion

Monday, October 31, 2016 - 09:00
The New Urban Agenda was officially adopted in Quito, Ecuador in the last plenary of the Habitat III conference. The agenda provides a 20-year “roadmap” to guide sustainable urban development globally. The text of the New Urban Agenda itself was agreed well before Habitat III at the UN General Assembly in September, during an extraordinary informal negotiation session that lasted for more than 30 hours.

Visual Melbourne

Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 17:00
Melbourne’s architectural landscape is a wonderful juxtaposition of modern and Victorian architecture. Although the CBD has been peppered with many skyscrapers, its historical structures have won Melbourne the title of “Australia’s most European city”.

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Transport & Design

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 08:30
The recent approval of Sterling Global 's mixed-use tower at 383 La Trobe Street adds to the influx of towers with international influence leaving their mark not only on Melbourne's skyline, but the city's streetscapes. The $700 million mixed-use tower, a collaboration between French design architect Ateliers Jean Nouvel and local Australian executive architect Architectus, has been designed with people at its core.

Sustainability & Environment

Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 12:00
Timber mid-rise buildings are becoming the preferred choice for many stakeholders in Melbourne, due to a combination of factors, including cost-effectiveness, liveability, ease and efficiency of construction. Within the recent National Construction Code change, Deemed-To-Satisfy provisions allow mid-rise timber construction for buildings up to 25 metres “effective height” (typically, eight storeys).