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Palace Theatre

20-30 Bourke Street as observed from the steps of Parliament. © Bates Smart

Blink and you'll miss it > The revised Palace Theatre proposal

Blink and you'll miss the most recent iteration - in a long procession of design proposals - for the Palace Theatre site at 20-30 Bourke Street. The current proposal is the response to the introduction of mandatory height limits to preserve the low-rise, finer grain scale of the Bourke Hill Precinct. Gone is the W Hotel brand, replaced with a 7-storey (4-storey podium + 3-storey hotel), 23m building consisting of 7,195sqm of boutique hotel space...

Palace Theatre redevelopment: Squat! But is it hot to trot?

Another chapter today in the evolving public interest story that has become the proposed Palace Theatre demolition and replacement with Australia's first W Hotel at 20-31 Bourke Street. Melbourne City Council have this week published plans for Bates Smart's third revision of the development scheme which sees a shortened, dare I say tubby hotel tower sans its apartment compliment included within the initial planning application. As has been...

Development & Planning

Monday, January 23, 2017 - 00:00
Prominent builder Hickory Group has added a third Melbourne project that will utilise the Hickory Building System (HBS). A proponent of prefabricated construction methods, Hickory Group's latest HBS-driven project will be Brisbane outfit Blue Sky Funds' 42-50 La Trobe Street.

Policy, Culture & Opinion

Tuesday, January 17, 2017 - 00:00
On 2 January 2017, it was reported that several popular eateries and bars in Footscray had been vandalised, including the perennially successful 8 Bit Burgers on Droop Street, and Up In Smoke on Hopkins Street. 8 Bit had the warm new year's welcome gift of 14 smashed windows and the words “F**k off hipster scum” spray-painted on their entrance.

Visual Melbourne

Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 17:00
Melbourne’s architectural landscape is a wonderful juxtaposition of modern and Victorian architecture. Although the CBD has been peppered with many skyscrapers, its historical structures have won Melbourne the title of “Australia’s most European city”.

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Transport & Design

Sustainability & Environment

Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 12:00
Timber mid-rise buildings are becoming the preferred choice for many stakeholders in Melbourne, due to a combination of factors, including cost-effectiveness, liveability, ease and efficiency of construction. Within the recent National Construction Code change, Deemed-To-Satisfy provisions allow mid-rise timber construction for buildings up to 25 metres “effective height” (typically, eight storeys).