Advertisement

Planning

Carr's Hoddle Street Development finds favour with Council

The City of Melbourne's Future (Planning) Committee this week resolved to issue conditional approval for a 10-storey building at 1071-1081 Hoddle Street in East Melbourne. The building would rise to a height of 31.54m and accommodate 26 apartments on a triangular shaped site with a total area of 311 sqm. The railway cutting for the Hurstbridge and South Morang lines abuts the rear of the site and a council lane stretches along the southern...

Gunnersen's radical Fishermans Bend intentions in limbo?

Timber merchant Gunnersen looks to have stumbled in an initial bid to revamp its Port Melbourne headquarters into a multi-towered residential development. As City of Port Phillip tabled a less than glowing report on the proposal last week, the project's status on the State Planning Register has been adjusted to 'on hold'. A planning application for the massive 17,500sqm site was lodged during April, lasting only a handful of months until it was...

City Road checks in; two new CBD hotel developments in the pipeline

The hotel juggernaut across inner Melbourne is showing no signs of slowing down. After last week's announcement that Mandarin Oriental will anchor the Zaha Hadid-designed 600 Collins Street , three further projects have come to the fore in recent days. A long expected Southbank project is headed for a construction start, whilst Melbourne City Council is attending to two further hotel-based planning applications. At 167 City Road, signage for...
Advertisement

Development & Planning

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 - 07:00
Hawthorn's Queens Avenue is emerging as an apartment hot spot of sorts, as developers realise the worth of converting the light industrial and commercial strip into a higher density apartment enclave. Running parallel to Burwood Road, Queens Avenue now has six apartment developments in progress.

Policy, Culture & Opinion

Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 12:00
Carolyn Whitzman , University of Melbourne Liveability is an increasingly important goal of Australian planning policy. And creating cities where residents can get to most of the services they need within 20 to 30 minutes has been proposed, at both federal and state level, as a key liveability-related mechanism.

Visual Melbourne

Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 12:00
Part Three follows on from the Part One: Yarra's Edge and Part Two: Victoria Harbour. The focus of today's piece will be NewQuay and Harbour Town, the northern most precincts within Docklands. NewQuay NewQuay was the first precinct to open way back in 2003 and has probably evolved the most.

Advertisement

Transport & Design

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 - 12:00
The Victorian Government has announced the winning bidders in the tender to power Melbourne's tram network by renewable energy. At the same time, the Victorian Government has announced plans to legislate the Victorian Renewable Energy Target (VRET) ensuring that by 2020, 25% of Victoria's energy will come from renewable sources and the target rises to 40% by 2025.

Sustainability & Environment

Monday, August 21, 2017 - 12:00
The notion of Melbourne becoming a 20-minute City has been explored heavily in recent times. Seeking to provide Melburnians with the ability to 'live locally', the 20-minute City, in essence, strives to provide people with the ability to meet most of their everyday needs within a 20-minute walk, cycle or local public transport trip of their home.