54-56 Clarke Street Southbank Approved

The Planning Minister, Matthew Guy, has given approval to 54-56 Clarke Street, Southbank.

54-56 Clarke Street, designed by BKK, will rise 240 metres above its peers, standing third tallest on Southbank (which could be shifted to forth tallest should 1-23 Queensbridge Street be built).  

Thanks to its slender profile, the building will only yield 256 apartments over 73 levels and the architects have managed to squeeze a café at ground level.  

Much of the talk in the mainstream press has revolved around the building's height however we at Urban Melbourne would like to draw attention to another important aspect of the building: its interaction with us, the passer-by on the street.

Image source: http://b-k-k.com.au/projects/multi-residential/project/clarke-street-apartment-development/

Organic, active, green and unlike anything either on or a stone's throw away from City Road - a picture speaks a thousand words.  

54-56 Clarke Street will inevitably become a destination for more than just its residents and it most certainly will be a welcome one in an otherwise street life deprived block of Southbank.

 

Media Release in full:

54-56 Clarke Street approval

5 comments

MelbourneGuy's picture

Absolutely love this one. There are so many going up at the moment that I'll be spoilt for choice.

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Alexander Sheko's picture

Good to hear there's a focus on contributing to a good ground-level/pedestrian environment. So much of the time it's all about what the building looks like from a distance. Let's hope it makes as much of a positive contribution to the streetscape as expected.

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troy's picture

Great,i was hoping this would be approved,will look amazing from a distance and close up for melbournes skyline.

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Bilby's picture

This looks like a fantastic design in many ways and the street frontage does indeed look fascinating with the organic forms and green wall. The precinct within which it sits is unpleasant in so many ways for the pedestrian and resident alike, though, I wonder who will want to live here? Southbank lacks human scale, is criss-crossed by ugly andy noisy roads and lacks street culture - hopefully buildings like this will improve things, but in terms of scale, it's hard to see how.

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Mark Baljak's picture

Wonder if the design spill onto the road will remain?

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